The best possible list so far for the Austin arts season

We are assembling the best possible preview list for the coming Austin arts season. This is what we have been able to gather so far.

Austin Chamber Music Center

Various locations, 512-454-0026, austinchambermusic.org

Sept. 22-23: Dvorak, Gershwin, Amy Beach

Nov. 17-18: Bizet, Mendelssohn, Borodin

Jan. 19-20, 2018: Mozart, Schubert, Mendelssohn

March 2-3, 2018: Ravel, Chopin, Piazzolla

April 6-7, 2018: Bach, Haydn, Rachmaninov

Austin History Center

810 Guadalupe St., 512-974-7480, library.austintexas.gov

Aug. 29, 2017-Jan. 28, 2018: “Austin at Midcentury: Photographs of Dewey Mears”

Aug. 15-Nov. 17: “Fehr & Granger, Architects: Austin Modernists” (Austin Center for Architecture)

Austin Opera

Long Center, 512-472-5992, austinopera.org

Nov. 11-19: “Carmen”

Jan. 27-Feb. 4, 2018: “Ariadne auf Naxos”

April 28-May 6, 2018: “La Traviata”

Austin Playhouse

6001 Airport Blvd., 512-476-0084, austinplayhouse.com

Sept. 1-24: “This Random World”

Dec. 1-23: “Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley”

Jan. 5-28, 2018: “The Immigrant”

March 23-April 22, 2018: “Shakespeare in Love”

May 25-June 24: “Curtains”

Austin Shakespeare

Long Center, 512-474-5664, thelcongcenter.org

Sept. 21-24: “The Crucible”

Nov. 16-Dec. 3: “Much Ado About Nothing”

Feb. 1-Feb. 25, 2018: “The Seagull”

May 3-27, 2018: “Merry Wives of Windsor” (Zilker)

The Austin Symphony will play along with Disney’s ‘Fantasia.’ Contributed

Austin Symphony

Long Center, 512-476-6064, austinsymphony.org

Sept. 8-9: Mozart, Poulenc

Oct. 6-7: Vaughan Williams, Beethoven, Mahler-Britten, Bruckner

Oct 20: Disney’s “Fantasia” in concert

Oct. 29: Halloween Children’s Concert

Dec. 1-2: Prokofiev, “Beyond the Score”

Dec. 12: Handel’s “Messiah”

Dec. 29-30: “I Heart the ’80s”

Jan. 12-13, 2018: Stravinsky, Rossini, Bach, Hovhaness, Haydn

Feb. 9, 2018: “Jurassic Park” in concert

Feb. 23-24, 2018: Schumann, MacDowell

March 23-24, 2018: Saint-Saëns, Jongen

April 12-14, 2018: Bernstein, Torke, Beethoven

May 18-19, 2018: Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, Rachmaninoff

Jun 1-2, 2018: “The Rat Pack: 100 Years of Frank”

June 16, 2018: Butler Texas Young Composers Concert

Austin Symphonic Band

Various locations. austinsymphonicband.org

Sept. 17: Fall Concert in the Park

Nov. 12: Indoor Concert No. 1

Feb. 11, 2018: Indoor Concert No. 2

April 8, 2018: Indoor Concert No. 3

May 13, 2018: Mother’s Day Concert

June 17, 2018: Father’s Day Concert

June 30, 2108: Bastrop Patriotic Festival

July 4, 2018: July Fourth Frontier Days Celebration

Ballet Austin

Long Center, 512-476-9151, balletaustin.org

Sept. 15-17: “Romeo and Juliet”

Oct. 21-29: “Not Afraid of the Dark” (Studio Theater)

Dec. 8-23: “The Nutcraker”

Feb. 16-18, 2018: “Masters of the Dance”

April 6-8, 2018: “Exit Wounds”

May 11-13, 2018: “Peter Pan”

Blanton Museum of Art

200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., blantonmuseum.org

Through Oct. 1: “Epic Tales from Ancient India”

Through Oct. 1: “Teresa Hubbard/Alexander Birchler: Giant”

Nov. 25-Jan. 7, 2018: “The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip”

Spring 2018: “Ellsworth Kelly’s Austin”

Big Medium

916 Springdale Road, 512-939-6665, bigmedium.org

Sept. 23-Dec. 2: Texas Biennial

Oct. 27-Nov. 19: Tito’s Prize Exhibit

Nov. 11-19: East Austin Studio Tour

Briscoe Center for American History

2300 Red River St., 512-495-4515

Through Sept. 17: “Exploring the American South”

Nov. 11, 2017-May 31, 2018: “Civil Rights Photography”

Broadway in Austin lands ‘A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder.’ Contributed

Broadway in Austin

Bass Concert Hall, 800-731-7469, BroadwayInAustin.com

Oct. 13-15: “Rent” (season option)

Dec. 12-17: “The King and I”

Jan. 16-21, 2018: “Finding Neverland”

Feb. 13-18, 2018: “School of Rock”

March 20-25, 2018: “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder”

April 17-22, 2018: “The Book of Mormon” (season option)

May 30-June 3, 2018: “An American in Paris”

Bullock Texas State History Museum

1800 Congress Ave., 512-936-8746, thestoryoftexas.com

Through Feb. 4, 2018: “The Nau Civil War Collection”

Through March 18, 2018: Pong to Pokémon: The Evolution of Electronic”

Sept. 2, 2017-Jan. 7, 2018: “American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition”

Feb. 17, 2018-Jan. 15, 2019: “Texas Rodeo”

Chorus Austin

Various locations, 512-719-3300, chorusaustin.org

Nov. 4-5: “Art of the Prophets”

Dec. 2: “On a Winter’s Eve”

Dec. 16: “Sing-It-Yourself Messiah”

City Theatre

3823 Airport Blvd., 512-524-2870, citytheatreaustin.orgtk

July 21-Aug. 13 “August: Osage County”

Aug. 18-Sept 10: “Chicago”

Co-Lab Projects’ Demo Gallery

721 Congress Ave., co-labprojects.org

Through July 23: “Unrealpolitick”

Aug. 5-26: “Expedition Batikback”

September: Claude van Lingen Retrospective

October: “Good Mourning Tis of Thee”

The Contemporary Austin – Jones Center

700 Congress Ave., 512-453-5312, thecontemporaryaustin.org

Sept. 23, 2017 – Jan. 14, 2018: “Wangechi Mutu”

Sept. 23, 2017 – Jan. 14, 2018: John Bock: “Dead + Juicy”

The Contemporary Austin – Laguna Gloria

3809 W. 35th At., 512-458-8191, thecontemporaryaustin.org

Sept. 23 – Ongoing: Ryan Gander: “The day to day accumulation of hope, failure and ecstasy”

Nov. 18 – Ongoing: “Carol Bove”

Conspirare

Various locations.

Oct. 10: Symphonic Choir Sings

Dec. 2-1: Conspirare Youth Choirs: Breath of Heaven

Dec. 9-14: Conspirare Christmas with Carrie Rodriguez

June 28-29, 2018: Bernstein Mass

Gilbert & Sullivan Austin

Various locations. gilbertsullivan.org.

Sept. 10: “The Daughter of the D’Oyly Carte”

Oct. 29: “Fall Gilbert & Sullivan Musicale”

Jan. 7: “Gilbert & Sullivan Revue and Sing-Along”

March 4-5: “Trail by Jury”

June 14-24: “Rudigore”

Georgetown Palace Theatre

810 S. Austin Ave., 512-869-7469, georgetownpalace.com

Sept. 1-Oct. 1: “You Can’t Do That Dan Moody” (Courthouse)

Sept. 29-Oct. 22: “Drinking Habits”

Oct. 20-Nov. 26: “Annie”

Oct. 27-Nov. 5: “Tony Harrison: Ballads & Bobbie Socks”

Nov. 17-Dec. 30: “Santaland Diaries”

Dec. 8-30: “A Christmas Carol”

Jan. 19-28, 2018: “Buddy Patsy”

Feb. 16-March 11, 2018: “Barefoot in the Park”

Feb. 23-March 25, 2018: “Mame”

March 30-April 22, 2018: “Dearly Departed”

April 20-May 20, 2018: “My Fair Lady”

June 1-24, 2018: “25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”

July 13-Aug. 12, 2018: “Mary Poppins”

Aug. 31-Sept. 30, 2018: “Million Dollar Quartet”

Hyde Park Theatre

511 W. 43rd St., 512-479-7529, hydeparktheatre.org

Through Aug. 5: “The Moors”

Sept. 21-Oct. 21: “The Wolves”

Jan. 16-Feb. 17. 2018: FronteraFest

March 1-31, 2018: “Wakey Wakey”

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Graham Reynolds lands at the Long Center. Contributed

Long Center for the Performing Arts

Aug. 11-13: “Fun Home”

Aug. 23: “An Evening with the Piano Guys”

Aug. 30: “An Evening with Carrie Rodriguez”

Sept. 13-14: Manual Cinema: “Lula Del Rey”

Sept. 16: “Kaki King: The Neck is a Bridge to the Body”

Sept. 30: Terrence Malick’s: “The Tree of Life”

Oct. 11-12: “Star Wars: A New Hope”

Oct. 21: “Shopkins Live!”

Oct. 25: “The Jeff Lofton Thang”

Nov. 13: Photographer Annie Liebovitz

Nov. 18: “An Evening with Maureen Dowd and Carl Hulse in Conversation”

Nov. 24: “Santa on the Terrace”

NOv. 24-25: “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Raindeer: The Musical”

Dec. 20: “Graham Reynolds Ruins the Holidays”

Dec. 29: “A Christmas Story: The Musical”

LBJ Presidential Library

2313 Red River St., lbjlibrary.org

Through Sept 6: “Deep in the Vaults of Texas”

Through Nov. 12: “On the Air: 50 Years of Public Broadcasting”

Oct. 28, 2017-Jan. 21, 2018: “Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection”

April 21, 2018-Jan. 13, 2019: “Get in the Game: Gender, Race and Sports in America”

Mary Moody Northen Theatre

St. Edward’s University campus, 512-448-8484, stedwards.edu/theatre

Sept. 28-Oct. 8: “Rhinoceros”

Nov. 9-19: “Anon(ymous)”

Feb. 15-25,2018: “Romeo and Juliet”

April 12-22, 2018: “Violet”

Mexic-Arte Museum

419 Congress Ave., 512-480-9373, mexic-artemuseum.org

Sept. 16–Nov. 26: “Diego y Frida: A Smile in the Middle of the Way”

Sept. 16–Nov. 26: “Community Altars”

October 2017–September 2018: “Changarrito Project”

 Oct. 17-September 2018: #ElMeroMuro”

Oct. 22: “The Catrina Ball: Viva Frida”

Dec. 9, 2017–Jan. 7, 2018: “Mix ‘n’ Mash 2017”

Dec. 9, 2017–Jan. 7, 2018: “Nacimientos y Retablos”

Jan. 26–March 1, 2018 and March 31–May 27, 2018: “Fotografia y Nuevos Medios from the Permanent Collection”

Jan 26–Feb. 14, 2018 and March 31–May 27, 2018: “Desert Triangle Print Portfolio”

June 15–Aug. 26, 2018: “YLA 23: Beyond Walls, Between Gates, Under Bridges”

June 15–Aug. 26, 2018: “Museum Studies Exhibition Library”

One World Theatre

7701 Bee Caves Road, 512-330-9500.

Aug. 10: Livingston Taylor

Aug. 11: Pieces of a Dream

Aug. 12: Edwin McCain

Aug. 20: Pure Prairie League

Sept. 2: Hillbenders – The Who’sTommy: A Bluegrass Opry

Sept. 3: The Everly Brothers Experience featuring the Zmed Bros

Sept. 8: Spyro Gyra

Sept. 9: David Cook

Sept. 10: Dailey & Vincent

Oct. 19: Joan Osborne

Oct. 22: Ricky Skaggs

Oct. 26: Jimmy Webb

Oct. 27: Lisa Fischer

Oct.  29: Jonathan Butler

Nov. 3: Guess Who

Nov. 9: Stanley Jordan

Nov. 12: Herman’s Hermits

Nov. 17: Ottmar Liebert

Nov. 19: Eddie Palmieri

Nov. 26: Riders In The Sky

Nov. 30: Kim Waters

Dec. 3: Petula Clark

Dec. 8: Norman Brown’s Joyous Christmas with Bobby Caldwell & Marion Meadows

Dec. 13: Annie Moses Band

Dec. 15: Tidings of Jazz & Joy with Keiko Matsui, Euge Groove featuring Lindsey Webster & Adam Hawley

Jan. 2018: Pete The Cat

Jan. 26, 2018: The Lettermen

Feb. 7-8, 2018: George Winston

Feb. 25, 2018: BJ Thomas

March 3, 2018: Judy Collins

March 10, 2018: Nugget & Gang

March 25, 2018: Take Six

March 30, 2018: 1964 The Tribute

April 29, 2018: Music of Abba

Gladys Knight.jpg
Gladys Knight. Contributed

Paramount and Stateside

713 Congress Ave., austintheatre.org

Sept. 22: The Flatlanders with Dan Penn

Sept. 23: Roger McGuinn

Sept. 28: Radney Foster

Sept.r 30: AJ Croce

Oct. 4: Lila Downs

Oct. 20: Del McCoury Band

Oct. 21: Selected Shorts

Oct. 21: Hal Ketchum

Nov. 8: An Evening of Storytelling with Garrison Keillor

Nov. 9: Demetri Martin presented by Moontower Comedy

Nov. 12: Jack Hanna’s Into The Wild Live

Nov. 17: Ray Wylie Hubbard’s Birthday Bash

Nov. 18: John Hodgman: Vacationland

Nov. 19: Gladys Knight

Dec. 1: A John Waters Christmas

Dec. 12: Tommy Emmanuel

Dec. 14: The Moth

Dec. 16: Bruce Robison & Kelly WillisTheatre

Jan. 31: Captain Scott Kelly

Penfold Theatre Company
Various locations, 512-850-4849, penfoldtheatre.org
Oct. 13-30: “Woman in Black”
Nov. 30-Dec. 23: “A Miracle on 34th Street Classic Radiocast”
Apr. 29, 2018: “A Marvelous Party”
May 31-Jun. 23, 2018: “Much Ado About Nothing”

Pollyana Theatre

Long Center, pollyanna.org

Sept. 30-Oct. 8: “A Moon of My Own’

Nov. 9-Dec. 18: “Chicken Story Time”

Jan. 18-Jan. 27, 2018: “Dog’s Job”

Feb. 14-Feb. 17, 2018: “Liberty, Equality and Fireworks!”

March 22-May 20, 2018: “Hurry Up and Wait”

May 12-May 20, 2018: “The Secret of Soap and Spin”

June 23-July 1, 2018: “If Wishes were Fishes”

July 12-July 21, 2018: “All Aboard!”

Ransom Center

300 We. 21st St., 512-471-8944, hrc.utexas.edu

Sept. 11, 2017-Jan. 1, 2018: “Mexico Modern: Art, Commerce and Cultural Exchange, 1920-1945”

Jan. 29-July 15, 2018: “Vaudeville”

Rude Mechs

Various locations, rudemechs.com

Aug. 27: “Gragelart”

Sept. 24: Stand-up Comedy Workshop

Oct. 21: “The Eye Ball”

November: “Gin & Tonix”

December: “Christmas Karaoke”

January, 2018: “Salon in a Salon”

February, 2018:  Off Center On Screen

March, 2018: “Fixing Troilus & Cressida”

April, 2018: “Perverse Results”

May, 2018: “Gragerlart”

Salvage Vanguard Theater

Various locations, salvagevanguard.org.

Oct. 26-Nov. 11: “Blu”

March 15-31, 2018: “Con Flama”

Tapestry Dance

Long Center, 512-474-9846, thelongcenter.org

Oct. 12-22: “Just Tap!”

Dec. 7-17: “Of Mice & Music: A Tap Jazz Nutcracker”

April 26-May 6, 2018: “April Fools”

June 14-16, 2018: “Soul 2 Sole Fest”

Texas Performing Arts presents the Philip Glass Ensemble playing with ‘Koyannisqatsi.’ Contributed

Texas Performing Arts

Various locations on UT Campus, 512-477-6060, texasperformingarts.org

Sept. 18: Dover Quartet

Sept. 21: Storm Large & Le Bonheur

Sept. 24: Spanish Brass

Sept. 29: Abraham.In.Motion

Oct. 5: Sergei Babayan

Nov. 8: Fifth House Ensemble’s Journey Live

Nov. 16: Seth Rudetsky’s Deconstructing Broadway

Nov. 18: Monty Alexander Harlem-Kingston Express

Dec. 1-2: Kurt Elling with the Swingles

Jan. 20, 2018: Chanticleer

Jan. 25-26, 2018: “Sancho: An Act of Remembrance”

Feb. 1, 2018: Ezralow Dance

Feb. 2, 2018: Ute Lemper

Feb. 16, 2018: Sergio & Odair Assad and Avi Avital

Feb. 23, 2018: Philip Glass Ensemble’s Koyaanisqatsi

March 8, 2018: “Musical Thrones: A Parody”

March 27, 2018: Che Malambo

April 3, 2018: University of Texas Symphony Orchestra

April 11, 2018: Hubbard Street Dance Chicago

April 14, 2018: University of Texas Jazz Orchestra with Conrad Herwig

Texas State University Theatre and Dance

Various locations on the Texas State campus. theatreanddance.txstate.edu

Sept. 26-Oct. 1: “A Chorus Line”

Oct. 12-15: “A Doll’s House”

Oct. 31-Nov. 5: “Perfect Pie”

Nov. 9-12: “We Are Proud to Present …”

Nov. 14-19: “Hamlet”

Feb. 1-4, 2018: “Speech and Debate”

Feb. 13-18, 2018: “The Rivals”

Feb. 22-25, 2018: “Instructions for Dancing”

April 10-15, 2018: “A Wrinkle in Time”

April 17-22: “Ragtime”

Umlauf Sculpture Garden and Museum

605 Robert E. Lee Road, 512-445-5582, umlaufsculpture.org

Aug. 8: “Umlauf After Dark”

Sept 5-Nov. 26: “Umlauf Prize Exhibition featuring Bucky Miller”

Oct. 29: “Last Straw Fest”

Nov. 12: Classical Garden

Feb. 14, 2018: Classical Garden

April 26, 201: Umlauf Garden Party

UT Butler School of Music (highlights)

Various locations on the UT campus. 512-477-6060, texasperformingarts.org

Sept. 7: Miró Quartet

Sept. 22: Thee Phantom & The Illharmonic Orchestra

Oct. 8: Anton Nel on the Fortepiano

Oct 27-Nov. 5: “Cosi Fan Tutte”

Nov. 16: Miró Quartet

Dec. 9: Holiday Choral Concert

Jan. 26, 2018: Miró Quartet

March 3, 2018: UT Symphony Orchestra

March 20-29, 2018: “Falstaff”

UT Theatre & Dance

Various locations on UT campus, 512-477-6060, texasperformingarts.org

Aug. 30-Sept 10: “Building the Wall”

Oct. 4-15: “Anon(ymous)”

Nov. 7-12: “Fall for Dance”

Nov. 8-19: “The Crucible”

Dec. 6-10: “The Drowsy Chaperone”

Feb. 21-March 4, 2018: “Enron”

March 28-April 8, 2018: “Transcendence”

April 12-22, 2018: “UT New Theatre”

UT Visual Arts Center

2300 Trinity St., 512-232-2348, utvac.org

Sept. 22-Dec. 9: Larry Bamburg

Sept: 22-Dec. 9: “Artists’ Books in Mexico”

Sept. 22-Oct. 20: Marta Lee and Anika Steepe

Sept. 22-Oct. 20: “New Barbizon Collective”

Sept. 22-Oct. 6: Fieldwork: “Mille Otto”

Rob Nash returns with ‘Holy Cross Sucks.’ Contributed by OUTmedia

The Vortex

2307 Manor Road, 512-478-5282, vortexrep.org

Sept. 8-24: “Storm Still”

Sept. 8-9: “Linda Mary Montano’s Birth/Death”

Sept. 22-Oct. 21: “Vampyress”

Oct. 4: “Icons: The Lesbian and Gay History of the World, Vol 1”

Nov. 2-5: “P3M5 Plays”

Nov. 9-11: “Somewhere Between”

Nov. 16-Dec. 9: “Wild Horses”

Nov. 17-Dec. 9: “The Member of the Wedding”

Dec. 14-17: “Rob Nash’s Holy Cross Sucks”

Dec. 21-Jan. 7, 2018: “The Muttcracker (Sweet!)”

Jan. 11-20, 2018: “The Way She Spoke”

Jan. 26-Feb. 10, 2018: “893/Ya-ku-za”

Feb. 14-18, 2018: Outsider Fest

Feb 22-25, 2018: “Reveal All Feature Nothing”

March 2, 2018: Cinema Dada

March 3, 2018: Congo Square

March 23-May 12, 2018: Performance Park

May 17-19, 2018: Toni Bravo’s “Home”

May 25-June 9, 2018: “Polly Mermaid”

June 15-30, 2018: “The Claire Play”

July 6-21, 2018: “The Last Witch”

July 27-Aug. 4, 2018: Summer Youth Theatre

Zach Theatre

202 S. Lamar Blvd., 512-476-0541

Through Sept. 3: “Million Dollar Quartet”

Sept. 27-Oct. 29: “Singin’ in the Rain”

Nov. 1-Dec. 31: “A Tuna Christmas”

Nov. 22-Dec. 31: “A Christmas Carol”

May 30-June 24, 2018: “Sunday in the Park with George”

June 20-July 22, 2018: “Heisenberg”

July 11-Sept. 2, 2018: “Beauty and the Beast”

 

 

Time to plan your fall season at the Long Center

A picture of Austin’s fall arts season is falling into place. The latest booking news is from the Long Center for the Performing Aarts. We rearranged, condensed and edited for style their fine descriptions of the following.

Notice that the fall season begins in July. Why not? We only wish the weather would comply.

Also, there’s a lot of other offerings, including Summer Stock Austin, at the center that aren’t part of this season package, so stay alert.

A character from Legend of Zelda. Contributed

“The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses
”


Dell Hall, July 7

Coinciding with the newly released “The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild” and Nintendo’s new Switch, this returns to the Long Center stage on July 7 for one performance only. Now in its fourth season and featuring new music and video, the concert comes to life with a 66-piece orchestra, 24-person choir.

“Fun Home”

Dell Hall, Aug. 11-13

The winner of five 2015 Tony Awards including Best Musical, Best Score, Best Book and Best Direction, this unusual show is based on Alison Bechdel’s 2006 best-selling graphic memoir.

“An Evening with The Piano Guys

Dell Hall, Aug. 23

The Piano Guys have become an internet sensation by way of their immensely successful series of self-made music videos, leading to over 500 million YouTube views.

Carrie Rodriguez. Jay Janner/American-Statesman

“An Evening with Carrie Rodriguez
”

Rollins Studio Theatre, Aug. 30

Austin native Carrie Rodriguez is a fiddle playing singer songwriter who approaches her country-blues sound with an “Ameri-Chicana” attitude.  Her latest release, “Lola,” takes her back to her ranchera musical roots and was hailed as the “perfect bicultural album” by NPR’s Felix Contreras.

Manual Cinema: “Lula Del Ray”

Rollins Studio Theatre,  Sept. 13-14          

This troupe of theatrical artists are not just puppeteers, but creators of otherworldly landscapes through a striking combination of live actors, old-school projectors and silhouette magic.

“Kaki King: The Neck is a Bridge to the Body 
”

Rollins Studio Theatre, Sept. 16

Hailed by Rolling Stone Magazine as “a genre unto herself,” composer, guitarist, and recording artist Kaki King performs her latest work — a simultaneous homage and deep exploration of her instrument of choice. In this bold new multi-media performance, Kaki deconstructs the guitar’s boundaries as projection mapping explores texture, nature, and creation.

Terrence Malick’s “The Tree of Life”

Dell Hall, Sept. 30

Part coming-of-age story and part divine commentary, Terrence Malick’s star-studded and slow-burning art film, “The Tree of Life,” sparked a dialogue within the industry about memory, the meaning of life, and the role that film can play in representing those ideas. Screening with live score performed by Austin Symphony Orchestra and Chorus Austin.

“Star Wars: A New Hope”

Dell Hall, Oct. 11–12

John William’s legendary “Star Wars” score didn’t just enhance a great story, it gave life to an entire galaxy. From “Binary Sunset” to the “Imperial March,” the themes of “A New Hope” ushered in a renaissance of film music, the likes of which Hollywood had never seen before. A special screening with live score performed by the Austin Symphony Orchestra.

“Shopkins Live!”

Dell Hall, Oct. 21

This lights up the stage in this premiere live production packed with show-stopping performances featuring the Shoppies and Shopkins characters taking the stage with an all-new storyline, music, and videos. Join Jessicake, Bubbleisha, Peppa-Mint, Rainbow Kate, Cocolette, and Polli Polish as they perform the coolest dance moves, sing the latest pop songs, and prepare for Shopville’s annual “Funtastic Food and Fashion Fair.”

Jeff Lofton. Contributed by Claire Newman.

“The Jeff Lofton Electric Thang
”

Rollins Studio Theatre, Oct. 25

Jazz artist Jeff Lofton – together with his groups The Jeff Lofton Trio and his Electric Thang – has quickly become a household name around Austin’s low-key bars and jazz lounges.

An evening with Maureen Dowd and Carl Hulse In Conversation

Dell Hall, Saturday Nov. 18

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Op-Ed columnist for the New York Times, Maureen Dowd, and award-winning author and the Times’ Chief Washington Correspondent, Carl Hulse, will examine the state of the nation one year following the most divisive presidential election in American history. Join us for an evening of incisive dialogue as Dowd and Hulse discuss how we got here and what lies ahead.

“Santa on the Terrace”

City Terrace, Nov. 24 

Bring the family and join us on the City Terrace and take some time out of the busiest holiday of the year to celebrate the season. Bring the kids for a free photo with Santa and enjoy holiday treats, activities and entertainment, all overlooking the best view in Austin!

“Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical”

Dell Hall, Nov. 24-25

The favorite TV classic soars off the screen and onto the stage in this beloved adaptation. Come see all of your favorite characters from the special including Santa and Mrs. Claus, Hermey the Elf, the Abominable Snow Monster, Clarice, Yukon Cornelius, and of course, Rudolph brought to life.

Graham Reynolds. Jay Janner/American-Statesman

“Graham Reynolds Ruins the Holidays”

Rollins Studio Theatre, Dec. 20

Composer and bandleader, Graham Reynolds, along with some of Austin’s best musicians wreak musical havoc with an explosive set of holiday favorites. By playing most of them in a minor key, Reynolds and his band bring a new perspective to these season standards.

“A Christmas Story: The Musical”

Dell Hall, Dec. 29–31

After a smash-hit Broadway run garnering three Tony-Award nominations including Best Musical, this Christmas classic returns for another year. Based on the perennial holiday movie favorite, the story takes place in 1940s Indiana, where a bespectacled boy named Ralphie wants only one thing for Christmas: an official Red Ryder Carbine-Action 200-shot range Model Air Rifle.

 

NEA dispatches almost $500,000 to Austin arts

The National Endowment for the Arts today announced almost $83 million in grants nationwide.

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The NEA has awarded $20,000 to Collide Arts to remount “Traffic Jam.” Contributed

Of that, $2.5 million went to Texas. Almost $1 million of that was given to the Texas Commission on the Arts to pass along to artists and arts groups statewide. In fact, of the $83 million that the NEA handed out today, almost $51 million went to its state partners like the Commission.

RELATED: Legislature cuts Texas arts funding 28 percent

Austin’s share of the NEA grants is distorted by the fact that the Texas Commission is located in the city but benefits artists statewide. Some of that will be spent here, but we don’t know yet how much.

Interestingly, the $100,000 that Austin’s Creative Action garnered was for a partnershiip with Six Square, a group that seeks to preserve and promote the historical and cultural legacy of African-American in East Austin. Six Square is a designated Texas Cultural Arts District, but the state legislature declined to fund $5 million for the more than 30 such districts statewide.

Unless I’m missing something, these are the Austin beneficiaries:

Forklift Danceworks: $40,000 (in two grants)

Austin Chamber Music Center: $20,000

Austin Classical Guitar: $55,000

Austin School District: $100,000

Big Medium: $20,000

KLRU: $10,000

Austin Cultural Arts Division: $50,000

Collide: $20,000

Conspirare: $30,000

Creative Action: $100,000

Texas Folklife: $35,000*

*UPDATE: Texas Folklife received an additional $38,000 grant for its statewide work.

The warm, loving, slightly boozy embrace of the Austin Critics Table Awards

The Austin Critics Table Awards ceremony was long. Very long. A record four hours at Cap City Comedy Club.

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Yet the 25th anniversary celebration of all things arts might have been the best one ever. Because every minute was a warm, loving, slightly boozy embrace between artists and the writers who cover them.

I loved every tribute from the critics and (almost) every enthusiastic and authentic acceptance speech. (Why do some people choose a moment of honor to be mean?) Bonus: a witty proclamation from Austin Mayor Steve Adler for the occasion

RELATED: Behold: The Austin Critics Table Awards nominees

Some people — well, a lot of people — left early. But then they missed the best acceptance speech of the evening, given by Christine Hoang, who shared the David Mark Cohen New Play Award with Lisa Thompson, and who talked about how each word from her reviews reduced her “imposter anxiety,” and whose bilingual play, “A Girl Named Sue,” represented a social and cultural leap for the descendants of Vietnamese refugees and their families.

The big news, however, was the expansion of the Critics Table to 20 members including web-based writers, a move I’ve strongly supported for years. The Table began with just five of us newspapermen, sole survivor Robert Faires reminded us — I no longer vote — and over the years has included more than 50 writers.

AUSTIN CRITCS TABLE AWARDS 2016-2017

W.H. “Deacon” Crain Award for Student Work: Madison Williams, Emily Ott

Lighting Design: Jason Amato (“Atlantis: A Puppet Opera”), Patrick Anthony (“A Perfect Robot,” “Old Times”)

Group Gallery Exhibition: “The First Horizons of Juno: Christina Coleman, Jane Hugentober, Candice Lin, Karen Lofgren, Christine Rebet, Alice Wang and Chantal Wnuk,” Mass Gallery

Museum Exhibition: “Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser,” Blanton Museum of Art

Singer: Donnie Ray Albert (“The Manchurian Candidate,” “I Too: The Voices of Langston Hughes”), Liz Cass (“Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance”), David Adam Moore (“The Manchurian Candidate”), Paul Sanchez (“Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance,” “A Christmas Carol”)

Chamber Performance: “I, Too: The Voices of Langston Hughes,” Living Paper Song Project

Original Composition/Score: “Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance,” Graham Reynolds & Lagartijas Tirades al Sol

Scenic Design: Chris Conard (“Totalitarians,” “The Drowning Girls”), Desiderio Roybal (“Clybourn Park,” “The Price,” “The Herd”)

Short Work, Dance: “Camille: A Story of Art and Love,” Jennifer Hart

Solo Gallery Exhibition: “Tammie Rubin: Before I Knew You, I Missed You,” De Stijl Podium for Art

Artist: Deborah Roberts

Costume Design: Susan Branch Towne (“One Man, Two Guv’nors,” “The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui”)

Dancer: Alexa Caparedo (“Tikling(bird),” “Loose Gravel”), Amy Morrow (“Hiraeth,” “We’ve Been Here Before”)

Ensemble Dance: Dance Repertory Theatre (“Momentum”)

Gallery, Body of Work: “Museum of Human Achievement”

Independent Project: “Workout with Erica Nix,” Erica Nix

Ensemble, Classical: Schumann Chamber Players

Classical Concert/Opera: “The Manchurian Candidate,” Austin Opera

Sound Design: Lowell Bartholomee, “Clybourne Park,” “Fahrenheit 451”

Direction: Jenny Lavery (“The Drowning Girls”), Lily Wolff (“Lungs”)

Dance Concert: “Las Cuatro Estaciones: A Story of Human Trees,” Sharon Marroquin, produced by Latino Art Residency Project, Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center

Choreographer: Lisa Nicks, “Dear Johnny, in Response to Your Last Letter”

Digital Design: Greg Emetaz, “The Manchurian Candidate”

David Mark Cohen New Play Award: “A Girl Named Sue” (Christine Hoang), “Underground” (Lisa Thompson)

Ensemble, Theater: “Nevermore: The Imaginary Life and Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe,” Doctuh Mistah Productions

Actor: Liz Beckham (“Lungs,” Neva,” “Clybourne Park), Chase Brewer (“Hand to God”), Michael Joplin (“Lungs”), Amber Quick (“One Man, Two Guv’nors,” “Charlotte’s Web,” “The Herd”)

Production, Theater: Clybourne Park (Penfold Theatre), “The Drowning Girls” (Theatre en Bloc), “The Great Society (Zach Theatre)

Special Citations: Luis Armando Ortiz Gutierrez, Jeanne Claire van Ryzin, Andrea Ariel, Babs George, “Rambunctious,” Jennifer Sherburn for “11:11,” Theatre Synesthesia, Sandy Yamamoto, Thr3e Zisters,” Amy Downing.

Austin Arts Hall of Fame: Katherine Brimberry and Mark L. Smith, Zell Miller III, Kate Warren

UPDATE: Thanks to Robert Faires for correcting some embarrassing typos in names banged out quickly this morning.

Giving City toasts Austin Critics Table Awards

If you missed the short history of the Austin Critics Table Awards written by Monica Maldonado Williams of Giving City and published in Sunday’s American-Statesman, below find a snippet. The free awards ceremony returns 7 p.m. June 5 at Cap City Comedy Club.

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The Austin Critics Table in in 1995. L-R: John Bustin, Barry Pineo, Michael Barnes, Jamie Smith Cantara, Belinda Acosta, David Mark Cohen, Jerry Conn and Robert Faires. (Bustin and Cohen are deceased.) Mark Fort/American-Statesman

FULL STORY:  At 25 years old, an arts awards event learns to adapt.

“While almost all Austin arts organizations operate as nonprofits, the caliber of the art has become more professional and innovative, said co-founder Robert Faires. To reflect the range of art, this year’s Critics Table judges have adjusted the categories to make them less theater-heavy.

“There’s more diversity among the artists and the art forms in Austin, but this is not just a participation award,” said David Wyatt, a long-time volunteer for the event and the owner of a public relations agency that specializes in the art organizations. “Artists have to wait years to the point where they’ve developed their craft and matured as an artists to get recognized. It’s very meaningful.”

RELATED: See this year’s nominees for the Austin Critics Table Awards.

“In addition to adjusting the categories, Faires has had to adjust the roster of judges. As the last of the founders participating, he realized that the awards should include the new breed of art writers, especially those who publish primarily online. This year’s judges include writers from websites and blogs like Broadway World Austin, Austin Entertainment Weekly, Arts & Culture Texas, and Conflict of Interest TX.”

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Monica Maldonado Williams. Ricardo B. Brazziell/American-Statesman

BACKGROUND: Monica Maldonado Williams cracks the charity code.

Behold: The 2017 Austin Critics Table Awards nominees

More than two decades ago, a half dozen ink-stained wretches sat down over obligatory martinis at a 24-hour deli to honor Austin artists. Thus was born the Austin Critics Table Awards, which return to Cap City Comedy Club on Monday, June 5.

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During the intervening years, artists, critics and award categories have come and gone. One constant: Robert Faires. The Austin Chronicle arts editor has shaped the awards in his image: generous, omnivorous and witty.  He’s always been as well the diligent note taker and records keeper for the disparate group of staff and freelance critics.

I retired from the Table — named after our usual meeting spot at Katz’s on West Sixth Street — many years ago when my wider wanderings led me to write about Austin’s people, places, culture and history.

I remained, however, passionately loyal to the arts. And more recently, I’ve written quite a few arts news and features stories. It’s important to emphasize, however, that I am no longer a critic. To be sure, opinion informs my reporting, but you won’t find any recent reviews under my byline in our archives.

It gives me considerable pleasure, then, to share with our readers the work of those staff and freelance reviewers which today culminates in the 2017 nominations for the Austin Critics Table Awards:
THEATRE
Production
Buyer and Cellar, Zach Theatre
Clybourne Park, Penfold Theatre
The Drowning Girls, Theatre en Bloc
The Great Society, Zach Theatre
Hand to God, Capital T Theatre
The Hotel Vanya, or A Metaphysical-Paradigm at the End of Everythingness, Natalie George Productions
Lungs, Hyde Park Theatre
Nevermore, the Imaginary Life and Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe, Doctuh Mistuh Productions
Song About Himself, Capital T Theatre
The Totalitarians, Theatre en Bloc

Direction
Ann Ciccolella, Old Times
Lindsay Doleshal, Dead Man’s Cell Phone
Katie Green, The Shift
Nathan Jerkins, Clybourne Park
Jenny Larson, With Great Difficulty Alice Sits
Jenny Lavery, The Drowning Girls
Mark Pickell, Song About Himself
Rudy Ramirez, A Perfect Robot
Dave Steakley, The Great Society
Lily Wolff, Lungs

David Mark Cohen New Play Award
Dust, Nicole Oglesby
A Girl Named Sue, Christine Hoang
The Hotel Vanya, or A Metaphysical-Paradigm at the End of Everythingness, Timothy Braun
A Perfect Robot, Sarah Saltwick
The Steadfast Tin Soldier, Allen Robertson & Damon Brown
Underground, Lisa Thompson
With Great Difficulty Alice Sits, Hannah Kenah
Wraith Radio, Chris Fontanes

Ensemble
Atlantis, A Puppet Opera, Ethos, with the Vortex
Clybourne Park, Penfold Theatre
The Drowning Girls, Theatre en Bloc
The Great Society, Zach Theatre
Neva, Theatre en Bloc
Nevermore, the Imaginary Life and Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe, Doctuh Mistuh Productions
Old Times, Austin Shakespeare
The World According to Snoopy, Texas State University Department of Theatre and Dance

Acting
Liz Beckham, Lungs/Neva/Clybourne Park
Chase Brewer, Hand to God
Jay Byrd, Hir
Barbara Chisholm, The Totalitarians
Jacqui Cross, For the Love of Mahalia
Sarah Danko, A Perfect Robot
Lana Dieterich, John
Bridget Farr, Dead Man’s Cell Phone
Judd Farris, Trevor
Joey Hood, W.
Michael Joplin, Lungs
J. Robert Moore, Buyer & Cellar
Marc Pouhé, Death of a Salesman/Underground
Amber Quick, One Man, Two Guv’nors/Charlotte’s Web/The Herd
Cecil Washington, Jr., The Great Society
DESIGN
Set
Theada Bellenger, The Addams Family
Chris Conard, The Totalitarians/The Drowning Girls
Ia Ensterä, Dead Man’s Cell Phone
Lisa Laratta, Poor Herman
Mark Pickell, Hir/Hand to God/John
Desiderio Roybal, Clybourne Park/The Price/The Herd
Court Watson, One Man, Two Guv’nors

Costume
Susan Branche Towne, One Man, Two Guv’nors/The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui
Jennifer Davis, Wolf Hall/Pride and Prejudice
E. L. Hohn, In the Red and Brown Water
Barry Doss, Priscilla, Queen of the Desert

Lighting
Jason Amato, Atlantis: A Puppet Opera
Patrick Anthony, A Perfect Robot/Old Times
Don Day, John
Kate Ducey, The Drowning Girls
Kathryn Eader, The Manchurian Candidate
Natalie George, The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui/11:11/Potential
Natalie George & Sadie Langenkamp, Riverside
Stephen Pruitt, More or Less/One Step at a Time/”panning_memory”
Alex Soto, Radiance
Scott Vandenberg, Las Cuatro Estaciones: A Story of Human Trees

Sound
Lowell Bartholomee, Clybourne Park/Fahrenheit 451
David DeMaris, A Perfect Robot
Robert Fisher, The Hotel Vanya
William Meadows, Radiance
Bill Mester, The Manchurian Candidate

Digital
Ana Baer, Las Cuatro Estaciones: A Story of Human Trees
Lowell Bartholomee, Fahrenheit 451
Greg Emetaz, The Manchurian Candidate
Eliot Gray Fisher, A Perfect Robot
DANCE
Concert
4×3, Performa/Dance
2016 Fall Dance Festival, Chaddick Dance Theater
Las Cuatro Estaciones: A Story of Human Trees, Sharon Marroquin, produced by Latino Art
Residency Project, Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
More or Less, Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Co.
One Step at a Time: A Journey Toward Present Grace, Tapestry Dance
Radiance, Blue Lapis Light

Short Work
“Black is the New Black,” Oluwaseun Samuel Olayiwola
“Camille: A Story of Art and Love,” Jennifer Hart
“Dear Johnny, in Response to Your Last Letter,” Lisa Nicks
“panning_memory,” Jennifer Sherburn
“Planets,” Michelle Thompson Ulerich
“Slowness,” Jun Shen
“Tikling(bird),” Alexa Capareda

Choreographer
Acia Gray, “Jazz Voices”/“Hourglass”/“Time”/“Listen”
Kathy Dunn Hamrick, More or Less/The Four (Three) Seasons/“Salud”
Sally Jacques, Radiance
Jennifer Hart, Camille: A Story of Art and Love
Sharon Marroquin, Las Cuatro Estaciones: A Story of Human Trees
Lisa Nicks, “Dear Johnny, in Response to Your Last Letter”
Kate Warren, Change Without Change

Dancer
Jeremy Arnold, Listen – With Ears Wide Open
Ellen Bartel, “Ocean”/Potential
Alexa Capareda, “Tikling(bird)”/Loose Gravel
Alyson Dolan, Las Cuatro Estaciones: A Story of Human Trees/The Four (3) Seasons/The Bowie Project/Potential
Lisa Anne Kobdish, More or Less/Potential/“Salud”
Sharon Marroquin, Las Cuatro Estaciones: A Story of Human Trees
Amy Morrow, Hiraeth/“We’ve Been Here Before”/Save Our Spaces Second Line March
Oren Porterfield, Camille: A Story of Art and Love/To China with Love
Andrea Torres, Listen – With Ears Wide Open

Ensemble
Ballet Austin, To China with Love/Belle Redux
Cast of Las Cuatro Estaciones: A Story of Human Trees
Dance Repertory Theatre, Momentum
Frank Wo/Men Collective, Loose Gravel
Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company,  More or Less
CLASSICAL MUSIC
Concert/Opera
Autumn Song, Conspirare
The Flying Dutchman, Austin Opera
Mahler: Symphony No. 6, Austin Symphony Orchestra
The Manchurian Candidate, Austin Opera
Rule of Three, Austin Symphony Orchestra
Symphonic Follies, Austin Symphony Orchestra

Chamber Performance
Drumming, line upon line percussion, for Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company’s More or Less
I, Too: The Voices of Langston Hughes, Living Paper Song Project
Sacred Shadows, Ensemble VIII
Schumann Chamber Players, Austin Chamber Music Festival

Original Composition/Score
Have a Good Day, Kathryn Mishell
Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance, Graham Reynolds & Lagaritas Tiradas al Sol
The Passive-Aggressive’s Guide to Mother Goose, Ross Crean
Problems, Rain Nox
String Quartet No. 4, Yevgeniy Sharlat
Potential, line upon line percussion

Singer
Donnie Ray Albert, The Manchurian Candidate/I, Too: The Voices of Langston Hughes
Liz Cass, Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance
Julia di Fiore, The Passive-Aggressive’s Guide to Mother Goose
Brenda Harris, The Manchurian Candidate
David Adam Moore, The Manchurian Candidate
Stefanie Moore, Autumn Song
Tim O’Brien, LOLA@4th Tap: January
Kathlene Ritch, Autumn Song
Paul Sanchez, Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance/A Christmas Carol

Ensemble
Conspirare
Ensemble VIII
line upon line percussion
Schumann Chamber Players
VISUAL ART
Solo Gallery Exhibition
“Ana Esteve Lloren: Studies for Future Objects,” Women & Their Work Gallery
“Lauren Moya Ford: New Hands on Old World Flowers,” Big Medium
“Liz Rodda: Heat Loss,” Women & Their Work Gallery
“Low Down: New Works On Paper by Ricardo Vicente Jose Ruiz,” Not Gallery
“Scorch and Drag: Prints and Sculptures by John Robert Craft,” Flatbed Gallery
“Tammie Rubin: Before I Knew You, I Missed You,” de stijl | PODIUM FOR ART
“Tania Mouraud: Everyday Ogres,” UT Visual Arts Center

Group Gallery Exhibition
“ANTHROPOCENE: Jonas Hart, Dameon Lester & Melissa Loop,” grayDUCK Gallery
“Femme National(e): Audrey Brown, Christina Coleman, Kasumi Chow / Desiree Michelle Espada, Emmy Laursen, Juliana Isabel Ramirez,” Pump Project
“Figure/Heads: David Bae and Erin Cunningham,” ICOSA Collective Gallery
“The First Horizons of Juno: Christina Coleman, Jane Hugentober, Candice Lin, Karen Lofgren, Christine Rebet, Alice Wang and Chantal Wnuk,” MASS Gallery
“March ON!” Christian-Greene Gallery at the Warfield Center
“One/Sixth,” de stijl | PODIUM FOR ART
“Textscape,” Co-Lab Projects DEMO Gallery,

Independent Project
“FinalCon,” Museum of Human Achievement, Ink Tank, Dys/Mem, Drew Paryzer, and Gwar
Spam’s, The Internet Diner, Museum of Human Achievement, Rachel Stuckey, curator
This is Hardcore, Sean Ripple
Workout With Erica Nix, Erica Nix
XYZ Atlas, Jennifer Chenoweth

Gallery, Body of Work
Co-Lab Projects DEMO Gallery
Flatbed Complex
Museum of Human Achievement
Not Gallery
Pump Project

Artist
Cliona Gunter
Amy Hauft
Beili Liu
Sean Ripple
Deborah Roberts

UPDATE: Four people will be inducted into the Austin Arts Hall of Fame: Zell Miller III (theater, spoken word); Katherine Brimberry and Mark L. Smith of Flatbed Press (visual arts); and Kate Warren (dance).

Think you can name that song? Not faster than Austin’s music memory students

Naming songs on the radio is a fun game for long road trips, but what about classical music from 200 years ago?

Debbie Tannert, seen here with her music memory students from the 2015-2016 season, is the granddaughter of Malcolm Gregory. In 2016, she retired from Mills Elementary after 30 years of teaching music, just like her mother, Mollie Gregory Tower. Photo contributed by Mollie Tower.

That’s the challenge for thousands of elementary and middle school students across Texas who participate in the music memory program. It’s a UIL-approved contest, so every year, the best students compete on teams at an annual citywide event.

The history of these performances — usually from a live orchestra in a public place where community members gather to watch — started 101 years ago in New Jersey and has a long history in Austin.

READ MORE: For 100 years, music memory classes have taught more than listening 

This year’s big AISD music memory contest returns on Saturday at the AISD Performing Arts Center. There are two rounds of the competition, one at 9 a.m. and another at noon. The event is free and open to the public.

After last year’s music memory contest (my son was a first-time competitor), I was so moved by the experience (a live orchestra of high school students! playing for elementary students who can name a song after hearing just three seconds of it!) and story behind the family who revived it after a decades-long absence that I wrote a story about it later that summer.

You’ll be sure that members of Malcolm Gregory’s family will be there to watch his love of music pass on to yet another generation of careful music listeners. Here’s a glimpse into their story:

A book belonging to Malcolm Gregory from 1923 on the Music Memory Contest which he participated in during the early 1920’s copied in Austin, Texas, on Monday, June 6, 2016. Malcolm Gregory first participated in the Austin ISD’s Music Memory Contest in the 1920’s. The family has helped keep that program alive and successful. RODOLFO GONZALEZ / AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

 

June 6, 2016- A copy of a circa 1920’s photograph of the Music Memory Contest trophy made in Austin, Texas, on Monday, June 6, 2016. Malcolm Gregory first participated in the Austin ISD’s Music Memory Contest in the 1920’s. The family has helped keep that program alive and successful. RODOLFO GONZALEZ / AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN
June 6, 2016- Debbie Tannert, her daughter, Christina Tannert, Mollie Gregory Tower, and Peggy Gregory Brunner, left to right, pose for a portrait holding a Music Memory Contest trophy dated 1921 in Austin, Texas, on Monday, June 6, 2016. Malcolm Gregory Mollie and Peggy’s father, Debbie’s grandfather and Christina’s great grandfather, first participated in the Austin ISD’s Music Memory Contest in the 1920’s. The family has helped keep that program alive and successful. RODOLFO GONZALEZ / AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

 

Mollie Gregory Tower, the daughter of Malcolm Gregory, who first fell in love with music contests as a boy in the 1920s. She now runs a music memory contest that writes curriculum to teach listening skills to young people. This is the list of UIL-chosen material for this year’s music memory contest, which takes place on Saturday at the AISD Performing Arts Center. Addie Broyles / American-Statesman

Curious about this summer’s Austin Chamber Music Festival?

Lots to linger over at the Austin Chamber Music Festival this summer. See you there!

Tickets now on sale: $20-$55. Special packages available. Student rush tickets: $12.

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Game changer Chargaux appears July 9. Contributed

2017 AUSTIN CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

All concerts at Bates Recital Hall at University of Texas except July 9 and July 14, which will be held at the North Door, 501 Brushy St.

July 7, 7:30 p.m.: Festival Chamber Orchestra, Andreas Mitisek, conductor

July 8, 7:30 p.m.: St. Lawrence String Quartet

July 9, 7:30 p.m.: Chargaux

July 14, 7:30 p.m.: Animated Shorts with Raul Jaurena & Tosca String Quartet

July 15, 7:30 p.m.: Scenes from Romeo & Juliet with Austin Shakespeare and Festival Artists

July 16, 3:00 p.m.: Lara St. John & Matt Herskowitz, The Lavuta Project

July 21, 7:30 p.m.: Daedalus Quartet

July 22, 7:30 p.m.: Cuban Finale – Crisantemi Quartet

July 23, 3:00 p.m.: Cuarteto Latinoamericano

 

Austin Symphony: Young composers rule!

The Austin Symphony has announced the nine young composers whose music will be performed on June 17 at the Long Center. This year, 24 pieces were submitted by composers 18 years or younger. Winners of the Sarah and Ernest Butler Texas Young Composers Competition — resulting from a $1 million Butler endowment — also earn scholarships ranging from $500 to $3,000.

Two of the nine winners are from Austin and two from San Antonio. One each is from Dallas, Houston, Plano, Cedar Park and Kennedale (which I had to look up; it’s in southern Tarrant County). Their schools are suitably scattered as well: Seven go to college, one is in high school and the young man from Kennedale is home-schooled.

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Paul Novak won First Prize in the Sarah and Ernest Butler Texas Young Composers Competition. Contributed by the Society of Composers.

FIRST PRIZE: Paul Novak. “On Buoyancy.” Houston. Rice University.

SECOND PRIZE: Isaac Villaroya. “Aegis.” San Antonio. Baylor University.

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Maximilien Hein won Third Prize in the Sarah and Ernest Butler Texas Young Composers Competition. Contributed

THIRD PRIZE: Maximilien Hein. “Impressions of a Hero’s Journey.” Cedar Park. Texas State University.

FOURTH PRIZE: Amy Gravell. “Prelude to Eternity.” Austin. McNeil High School.

FIFTH PRIZE: Dara Li. “Gaia.” Plano. Harvard University.

OTHER WINNERS

Austin Ali. “Ostinato.” Dallas. University of Texas.

Zach Berry. “Reflection and March to War.” Kennedale. Home Schooled.

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Sophie Mathieu’s “The Columbia River in June” will be performed by the Austin Symphony. Contributed

Sophie Mathieu. “The Columbia River in June.” Austin. University of Southern California.

Angelo Salgado. “Unity.” San Antonio. University of Texas San Antonio.

UPDATE: An earlier version of this post listed the wrong date for the concert.

Austin Symphony earns raves and $1 million gift

It’s been quite a week for the Austin Symphony. It earned some its most glowing notices in years. It also secured a $1 million gift.

It came in the form of a bequest from patron Ronald C. Jernigan to kickstart the group’s Moto Perpetuo Society, a club established for those who plan gifts to the symphony’s endowment $100,000 or more.

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Ronald C. Jernigan announces $1 million bequest to the Austin Symphony. Contributed

“Ever since returning to Austin, I have been so taken with the Austin Symphony,” Jernigan says. He’s also a big fan of endowments, which conservatively allow groups to spend the earnings from interest, but keep the principal safe.

Joining Jernigan in the society are Araminta and Tom Sellers as well as Bruce and  Kathryn Grube.

According to the Weathminder website, Jernigan is a Spicewood-based investment advisor with the National Planning Corporation.