Austin’s longest-running quilt show returns Sept. 28-30 with mini quilts, rainbows of color

Quilters and sewing nerds are all around you.

Sometimes, they look like the grandmothers and mothers who might have taught you to sew a long time ago, but increasingly, they look like men and young people and punk rockers and people who also run marathons on the weekend.

I’m one of those quilt fans who looks forward to the annual shows that bring together the country’s best quilters. (You should have seen how excited I was to see the Houston International Quilt Show a few years ago.) Austin has hosted a number of large quilt shows in the past few years, including several Modern Quilt Guild’s international QuiltCon shows, but the Capital of Texas QuiltFest is the longest-running quilt show in Austin.

RELATED: Austin-area quilt bees, shows celebrate traditional, modern quilting

Hosted by the Austin Area Quilt Guild, the show has taken place every other year since 1980, and the event returns to the Palmer Events Center, 900 Barton Springs Road, on Sept. 28-30.

The theme this year is “World of Color,” and you can see the more than 350 quilts on display — and the quilting, fabric and sewing vendor booths, as well as live demonstrations  — from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.

This year, they also have a special exhibit featuring 46 miniature quilts that are also competing for prizes. Tickets cost $10 online and $10 at the door. Children 12 and under are free.

From a release:

Through the Capital of Texas QuiltFest, AAQG is able to share its mission (preserving the art form and heritage of quilting and promoting excellence and education in quilt-making) with the greater community around us. Through the show, we share our art medium with others and widen their horizons to appreciate quilts in new and unexpected ways.

By displaying these quilts for the public to view and enjoy as well as conducting live demonstrations of various quilting techniques, the AAQG is fostering growth and appreciation of this art form. Visitors will find that quilts aren’t just something made for the bed anymore. They find themselves astonished by the artistry of these quilts. Our members come from diverse cultural backgrounds, and those themes can be seen in their displayed quilts. There is truly something for everyone to appreciate and enjoy at the QuiltFest.

Here are some of the quilts that will be on display this year. You can find out more about the show at captxquiltfest.org.

Austin artist, musician Steve Parker wins $15K Tito’s Prize

Big Medium, which marshals some of the city’s most precious visual art resources, could not have chosen a more timely winner for its $15,000 Tito’s Prize.

Artist and musician Steve Parker has won the 2018 Tito’s Prize. Contributed

A musician, artist and curator, Steve Parker has been involved in some of the city’s outstanding collaborative projects, beloved by the public as well as critics and colleagues, including work on the city’s much-discussed grackle population.

The prize comes with a solo exhibition at the Big Medium Gallery, Oct. 19-Nov. 18, as well as a key spot on the East Austin Studio Tour (Nov. 10-18).

Parker’s public art is embraced by just about everyone. Contributed by Philip Rogers.

RELATED: Zack Ingram won 2017 Tito’s Prize.

Three judges — Andrea MellardDennis Nance and Veronica Roberts, all arts insiders — joined voices in picking Parker.

Parker is also part of the Austin community fascinated by grackles. Contributed

RELATED: Sex, race and grackles — Fusebox Festival covers many moods.

“Parker exemplifies the way contemporary artists push beyond the boundaries of genres and media towards the pursuit of creativity,” Mellard says. “His strong artistic practice in new music performance, in sites ranging from parks to parking lots, has expanded into public sound sculptures and more recently installations. His generous approach brings together groups of trained performers and even invites curious members of the public to participate in his scores.”

SOMEWHAT RELATED: More Grackle Week 2018.

For the first time in 10 years, Blanton Museum of Art raises ticket prices

The home of Ellsworth Kelly‘s “Austin” and Vincent Valdez‘s “The City” will soon become more expensive for some guests to visit.


RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

As of Sept. 1, the adult ticket price at the Blanton Museum of Art will increase from $9 to $12 and the senior price will increase from $7 to $10.

RELATED: UT unveils large-scale painting of Klan members

In comparison, top ticket prices at the Museum of Fine Arts-Houston are $23; San Antonio Museum of Art are $20; Dallas Museum of Art are $16; Fort Worth’s The Modern are $16; Fort Worth’s Kimbell Art Museum are $14; SMU’s Meadows Museum of Art are $12

The Menil Collection in Houston and Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston are free. Also, the Kimbell’s magnificent permanent collection, as opposed to its special exhibitions, is free.

Admission to the Blanton remains free on Thursdays and to certain subsets of visitors. It also remains closed on Mondays.

Vincent Valdez’s work “The City” is on display at the Blanton Museum of Art. In a forum on Tuesday for the unveiling, Valdez talked about the quiet ubiquity of white supremacy in American life. Rodolfo Gonzalez for American-Statesman

RELATED: Ellsworth Kelly’s “Austin” worships light.

Complete price list as of Sept. 1:

Members: Free

UT Faculty/Students/Staff (with valid ID): Free

Adults: $12

Seniors (65+): $10

College Students (with valid ID): $5

Teachers (with valid school ID): Free

Youths (13-21): $5

Children 12 & under: Free

Active Military: Free

UPDATE: Added info about the Kimbell to this post.

Winners rejoice for 2018 Austin Critics Table Awards

Seems like yesterday when we sat down at Katz’s Deli to vote on the first Austin Critics Table Awards. Now a whole new generation of arts journalists are making the decisions. We could not be happier.

The following individuals and groups were honored Monday night at Cap City Comedy Club. (If I missed any, let me know.)

CRITICS TABLE AWARDS 2018

THEATER

Production (tie)

“Henry IV,” The Hidden Room Theatre

“Ragtime,” Texas State University Department of Theatre and Dance

RELATED: “Ragtime” is an American classic.

Direction

Jason Phelps, “The Brothers Size”

David Mark Cohen New Play Award

“Wild Horses,” Allison Gregory

Performance by an Individual

John Christopher, “The Brothers Size”/”Fixing Troilus and Cressida”

Chanel, “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill”

Jennifer Coy Jennings, “Wild Horses”

Sarah Danko, “The Effect”/”Grounded”

Judd Farris, “Henry IV”/”The Repentance of Saint Joan”

Joseph Garlock, “The Immigrant”

Performance by an Ensemble

“The Wolves,” Hyde Park Theatre

Periphery Company

“Wimberley Players,” Wimberley

Improvised Production
“Orphans!,” The Hideout Theatre
“Speak No More,” Golden

DESIGN

Set (tie)

Stephanie Busing, “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”

Chris Conard/Zac Thomas, “Pocatello”

Costume

Buffy Manners, “Shakespeare in Love”

Lighting

Rachel Atkinson, “Scheherazade”/”Twenty-Eight”/”Catalina de Erauso”/”The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”/”Con Flama”

Sound

Lowell Bartholomee, “Grounded”

Digital (tie)

Lowell Bartholomee, “The Effect/Wakey Wakey”/”The Repentance of Saint Joan”/”Grounded”

Robert Mallin, “Enron”

DANCE

Concert

(“Re)current Unrest”, Charles O. Anderson/Fusebox Festival

Short Work

“Four Mortal Men,” Ballet Austin

Choreographer

Jennifer Hart, “Fellow Travelers”/“Murmuration”

Dancer

Anika Jones, “Belonging, Part One”

Rosalyn Nasky, “Come In!!!”/”Pod”/”There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe”

Jun Shen, “Belonging, Part One”

Ensemble

“Exit Wounds”/”Masters of Dance,” Ballet Austin

RELATED: Ballet Austin aims for the heart with “Exit Wounds.”

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Concert/Opera

“Southwest Voices,” Chorus Austin

Chamber Performance

Golden Hornet Young Composers Concert, Golden Hornet

Original Composition/Score

“I/We,” Joseph V. Williams II

Singer

Marina Costa-Jackson, “La Traviata”

Jenifer Thyssen, “An Early Christmas”/”It’s About Time: Companions”/”Complaints Through the Ages”

Veronica Williams, “Songs of Remembrance and Resistance”

Ensemble

“Invoke, Beerthoven”/Golden Hornet Smackdown IV

Instrumentalist (tie)

Bruce Colson, “It’s About Time: Companions”

Artina McCain, “Black Composers Concert: The Black Female Composer”

VISUAL ART

Solo Gallery Exhibition

“Claude van Lingen: Timekeeper,” Co-Lab Projects

Group Gallery Exhibition

“Yo soy aqui / I am here,” ICOSA

Museum Exhibition

“The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip,” Blanton Museum of Art

Independent Project

2017 Texas Biennial

Gallery, Body of Work

Co-Lab Projects

Artist

Michael Anthony Garcia

SPECIAL CITATIONS

John Bustin Award for Conspicuous Versaility: Mary Agen Cox, Jeff Mills

Deacon Crain Award for Outstanding Student Work: Connor Barr, Kat Lozano, UT; Ben Toomer, Texas State

Outstanding Music Direction: Austin Haller for “Ragtime”

Outstanding Choreography: Natasha Davison for “The Drowsy Chaperone”

Horn of Plenty Award: Benjamin Taylor Ridgeway & Jennifer Rose Davis for the masks in “Rhinoceros”

Jurassic Spark Award: The Hatchery for creating the raptors in “Enron”

One Singular Sensation Award: Kaitlin Hopkins for the Texas State University Musical Theatre Program

RELATED: Kaitlin Hopkins takes Texas State to the top.

Always a Safe Flight Award: Barry Wilson & Team for Rigging Design & Execution in “Belonging, Part One”

Outstanding Touring Show, Dance: Johnny Cruise Mercer and Fusebox Festival for “Plunge In/To 534”

Architecture is Art Award: Blanton Museum of Art for Ellsworth Kelly’s “Austin”

Mount Everest Award: Vortex Repertory Theatre for “Performance Park”

Flip the Table Award: David Wyatt and John Riedie for meritorious service to the Austin Critics Table

AUSTIN ARTS HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Norman Blumensaadt (Different Stages) – company founder, artistic director, director, actor

Kathy Dunn Hamrick (Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company, Cafe Dance) – company founder, artistic director, choreographer, dancer, educator

Michael and Jeanne Klein (Blanton Museum of Art, The Contemporary Austin, Ransom Center, et al.) – patrons, board members, civic leaders, arts advocates

Anuradha Naimpally (Austin Dance India, Cafe Dance) – company founder, artistic director, dancer, choreographer, educator

Critics name finalists for 2018 Austin arts awards

It’s time. The Austin Critics Table Awards nominations came out this morning.

Buzz Moran at the Critics Table Awards at Cap City Comedy Club in 2008. That’s a decade ago! Michael Barnes/AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

The gathered minds invented new categories, both under the heading of Theater: Periphery Company, recognizing the theatrical body of work by companies outside of Austin proper, and Improvised Production, recognizing mainstage projects by area improv troupes.

That puts the number of official categories this year at 29 (7 theater, 5 design, 5 dance, 6 classical music, 6 visual arts). Critics also promise at least 11 special citations.

RELATED: 2018 Austin Arts Hall of Fame honorees.

The ceremony is 7 p.m. June 4 at Cap City Comedy Club, 8120 Research. Admission is free. The public is welcome.

Logo for Austin Critics Table Award. By Michael Crampton for American-Statesman

AUSTIN CRITICS TABLE NOMINATIONS 2018

THEATER

Production

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, ZACH Theatre

Enron, UT Austin Department of Theatre & Dance

Henry IV, The Hidden Room Theatre

Pocatello, Street Corner Arts

Ragtime, Texas State University Department of Theatre and Dance

The Repentance of Saint Joan, Paper Chairs

The Wolves, Hyde Park Theatre

Direction

Jason Phelps, The Brothers Size

Rudy Ramirez, The Revolutionists/Storm Still/Wild Horses/The Way She Spoke: A Docu-Mythologia

kt shorb, Scheherazade

Dave Steakley, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Benjamin Summers, Pocatello

Dustin Wills, Catalina de Erauso

Hannah Wolf, Enron

David Mark Cohen New Play Award

Catalina de Erauso, Elizabeth Doss

Fixing Troilus and Cressida, Kirk Lynn

The Repentance of Saint Joan, Patrick Shaw

Scheherazade, Scheherazade ensemble

The Secretary, Kyle John Schmidt

A Shoe Story, Allen Robertson & Damon Brown

Wild Horses, Allison Gregory

Performance by an Individual

John Christopher, The Brothers Size/Fixing Troilus and Cressida

Crystal Bird Caviel, The Moors/Fixing Troilus and Cressida

Chanel, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill

Jennifer Coy Jennings, Wild Horses

Sarah Danko, The Effect/Grounded

Sam Domino, Prodigal Son

Judd Farris, Henry IV/The Repentance of Saint Joan

Joseph Garlock, The Immigrant

Bill Karnovsky, Yankee Tavern

Katie Kohler, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Robert Matney, Henry IV

Amber Quick, Pocatello/The Secretary

Performance by an Ensemble

A Chorus Line, Texas State University Department of Theatre and Dance

Catalina de Erauso, Paper Chairs

Enron, UT Austin Department of Theatre & Dance

Pocatello, Street Corner Arts

The Seafarer, City Theatre

Vampyress, Vortex Repertory Company

The Wolves, Hyde Park Theatre

Periphery Company

Gaslight Baker Theatre, Lockhart

Georgetown Palace Theatre, Georgetown

Fredericksburg Theater Company, Fredericksburg

Way Off Broadway Community Players, Leander

Wimberley Players, Wimberley

Improvised Production

The 48-Hour Improv Marathon: Hour 48, The Hideout Theatre

Broad Ambition, Girls Girls Girls

Deja Noir, ColdTowne Theater

The Kindness of Strangers, The Hideout Theatre

Latinauts: The Wrath of Juan, Prima Doñas

Orphans!, The Hideout Theatre

Speak No More, Golden

2018 Critics Table Awards June 4 jpg

DESIGN

Set

Stephanie Busing, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Chris Conard/Zac Thomas, Pocatello

Magdalena Jarkowiec, “In Here”

Lisa Laratta, Catalina de Erauso/The Repentance of Saint Joan

Roxy Mojica, Enron

Desiderio Roybal, The Father

Lino Toyos, The Drowsy Chaperone

Costume

Emily Cawood, “Fellow Travelers”/“Klein Blue (The Void)”

Jennifer Rose Davis, The Revolutionists

Cait Graham, Enron

E.L. Hohn, Catalina de Erauso

Buffy Manners, Shakespeare in Love

Cheryl Painter, The Moors

Barbara Pope, The Drowsy Chaperone

Lighting

Rachel Atkinson, Scheherazade/Twentyeight/Catalina de Erauso/The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time/con flama

Natalie George, 11:11:10/11:11:11/A Study in Release/Romeo and Juliet/There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe

Sarah EC Maines, In the Heights

Steven Myers, “Fellow Travelers”/”Murmuration”/“Klein Blue/The Void”

Stephen Pruitt, Parade/Juana: First (I) Dream/Glacier/Diet Fizz Radio/Bartholomew Swims

Alex Soto/Ilios Lighting, Belonging, Part One

Tony Tucci, Exit Wounds

Sound

Lowell Bartholomee, Grounded

Robert S. Fisher, The Moors/Wakey Wakey

William Meadows, Belonging, Part One

Robert Pierson & Dustin Wills, Catalina de Erauso

Drew Silverman, “A Meditation”

Jesse Wilson, with Brandon Guerra, John Clark Gable, and KIVI, Diet Fizz Radio

Digital

Lowell Bartholomee, The Effect/Wakey Wakey/The Repentance of Saint Joan/Grounded

Ashton Bennett Murphy, “Mirror”

Eliot Gray Fisher, “In the Ether”

Robert Mallin, Enron

DANCE

Concert

A Study in Release, The Illusory Impressions Project

Fall for Dance, Dance Repertory Theatre

First (I) Dream, A’lante Flamenco

Masters of Dance, Ballet Austin

Midsummer Offerings, Performa/Dance

Parade, Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company

(Re)current Unrest, Charles O. Anderson/Fusebox Festival

Short Work

“Finale,” Jennifer Sherburn

“Four Mortal Men,” Ballet Austin

“In Here,” Magdalena Jarkowiec/Fusebox Festival

“In the Ether,” Dance Repertory Theatre

“Murmuration,” Ballet Austin II

“Overseas Phone Call, 1987,” Magdalena Jarkowiec/Performa/Dance

“When,” Dance Repertory Theatre

Choreographer

Charles O. Anderson, (Re)current Unrest

Kathy Dunn Hamrick, Parade/Glacier

Rennie Harris, “Resurrection”

Jennifer Hart, “Fellow Travelers”/“Murmuration”

Taryn Lavery & Alex Miller, with Hailley Laurèn, Amy Myers, and Lucy Wilson, Diet Fizz Radio

Ray Eliot Schwartz, “Otras Puertas/Otras Rumbos”

Jennifer Sherburn, “Lapse”/”Finale”

Dancer

Charles O. Anderson, “(Re)current Unrest pt. 3: Clapback”

Ellen Bartel, “Attic”

Alexa Capareda, “Diet Fizz Radio”/”Overseas Phone Call, 1987”/”In Here”

Anika Jones, Belonging, Part One

Anuradha Naimpally, “Krishna the Divine Lover”

Rosalyn Nasky, “Come In!!!”/”Pod”/There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe

Kelsey Oliver, “Overseas Phone Call, 1987”/”In Here”

Oren Porterfield, “Fellow Travelers”

Emily Rushing, “Flicker.Burn.Repeat”

Jun Shen, Belonging, Part One

Ensemble

Exit Wounds/Masters of Dance, Ballet Austin

“Fellow Travelers,” Performa/Dance

“Otras Puertas/Otras Rumbos,” Fall for Dance

Parade, Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company

(Re)current Unrest, Charles O. Anderson/Fusebox Festival

“Resurrection,” Dance Repertory Theatre

There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe, ensemble

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Concert/Opera

Bach: Mass in B Minor, Panoramic Voices

Carmen, Austin Opera

La Clemenza di Tito: A Retelling, LOLA

Feast of Voices, Austin Symphony Orchestra with Chorus Austin

Southwest Voices, Chorus Austin

La Traviata, Austin Opera

Unclouded Day, Conspirare

Chamber Performance

Invoke, Beerthoven/Golden Hornet Smackdown IV

Golden Hornet Young Composers Concert, Golden Hornet

i/we, Austin Classical Guitar

It’s About Time: Companions, Texas Early Music Project

The Lavuta Project, Austin Chamber Music Festival

Virgo Veritas, Austin Chamber Music Center

Original Composition/Score

A Study in Release, Catherine Davis

Crone – for Chamber Orchestra, Samuel Lipman

i/we, Joseph V. Williams II

“Songs of Remembrance and Resistance,” Kevin March

Singer

Ryland Angel, Passio/It’s About Time: Companions

Cayla Cardiff, An Early Christmas/It’s About Time: Companions

Liz Cass, La Clemenza di Tito: A Retelling

Marina Costa-Jackson, La Traviata

Carolyn Hoehle, La Clemenza di Tito: A Retelling

Gitanjali Mathur, It’s About Time: Companions

Sandra Piques Eddy, Carmen

Heather Phillips, Carmen

Chad Shelton, Carmen

Jenifer Thyssen, An Early Christmas/It’s About Time: Companions/Complaints Through the Ages

Veronica Williams, “Songs of Remembrance and Resistance”

Ensemble

Aeolus Quartet, Virgo Veritas

Invoke, Beerthoven/Golden Hornet Smackdown IV

Tetractys, Golden Hornet Young Composers Concert

Instrumentalist

Bruce Colson, It’s About Time: Companions

Ian Davidson, Feast of Voices

Artina McCain, Black Composers Concert: The Black Female Composer

Carla McElhaney, Revel Classical Band at Beerthoven

Marcus McGuff, An Early Christmas

Ebonee Thomas, Black Composers Concert: The Black Female Composer

Bruce Williams, Feast of Voices

VISUAL ART

Solo Gallery Exhibition

“Anthony B. Creeden: Cacti and Semaphore,” GrayDuck Gallery

“Bucky Miller: Grackle Actions,” Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum

“Claude van Lingen: Timekeeper,” Co-Lab Projects

“Larry Bamburg: BurlsHoovesandShells on a Pedestal of Conglomerates,” UT Visual Arts Center

“Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons: Notes on Sugar,” Christian-Green Gallery

“Rachel Stuckey: Good Days and Bad Days on the Internet,” Women & Their Work

“Raul Gonzalez: Doing Work,” GrayDuck Gallery

Group Gallery Exhibition

“Collectors Show,” GrayDuck Gallery

“Good Mourning Tis of Thee,” Co-Lab Projects

“In depth: a group show,” Davis Gallery

“Refigured: Radical Realism,” Dougherty Arts Center

“Staycation 2: What in the World?” Mass Gallery

“xoxo,” Museum of Human Achievement

“Yo soy aqui / I am here,” ICOSA

Museum Exhibition

“Rodney McMillian: Against a Civic Death,” The Contemporary Austin

“Line Form Color,” Blanton Museum of Art

“The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip,” Blanton Museum of Art

“Vaudeville,” Ransom Center

“Wangechi Mutu,” The Contemporary Austin

Independent Project

2017 Texas Biennial

Cage Match Project Gallery

The Museum of Pocket Art

Outsider Fest

Gallery, Body of Work

Co-Lab Projects

Dimension Gallery

GrayDuck gallery

Mass Gallery

Museum of Human Achievement

Artist

Jennifer Balkan

Elizabeth Chiles

Michael Anthony Garcia

Revi Meicler

Barry Stone

 

Get an early look at what’s coming up at Creek Show 2018

Creek Show, the annual procession of light art staged by the Waller Creek Conservancy, turned a corner of sorts last year.

What started as mostly elegant minimalist efforts along downtown Austin’s eastern waterway went maximalist in 2017 with masses of pink flags for “Night Garden” by Daniel Woodroffe (lead), Kim Harding, Francisco Rosales, Ethan Primm and Kevin Sullivan.

UPDATE: Credits for “Night Garden” appeared incorrectly in a previous version of this post.

“Night Garden” was a hit for the Creek Show in 2017. Created by Daniel Woodroffe (lead), Kim Harding, Francisco Rosales, Ethan Primm and Kevin Sullivan. Contributed by DWG via creekshow.com

The designs for year five — the free event will be Nov. 9-17 — were recently announced and promise to continue the large-scale experience. In 2017, more than 20,000 people attended Creek Show, sampling the kind of attractions planned for a transformed Waller Creek. For 2018, Creek Show will be in a different section of Waller Creek — between Ninth and 11th streets — and include Symphony Square, where the “Creek Show Lounge” will be located.

Here’s a look at early renderings of what’s planned for 2018, along with the teams behind the designs:

“Tentsion”

By Perkins + Will

Chet Morgan, Assoc. (lead)

Jenny Adair

Caitlin Admire

Aaron Manns

Emilie Ogburn

Ellen Saathoff

Paul Ward

“Ambedo βeta”

By Polis

Daniel Goodwin (lead)

Brianna Graves

Olivia Nguyen

Bruce Wilcoxon

“Parabolus”

By aod

Jose Roberto Corea (lead)

Courtney Jones Burton

Gretchen Leigh Du Pré

Jeff Fletcher

“Light Lines”

By Campbell Landscape Architecture + Tab Labs

Cameron Campbell (lead)

Bill Baird

Taurin Barrera

Stuart Campbell

Jenny Janis

Viddhi Jhaveri

“La Noria”

By Drophouse Design

Christian Klein (lead)

Matt Satter

Christy Taylor

“Urban Scrim”

By Lemmo Architecture and Design

Ryan Lemmo, (lead)

Stephanie Lemmo, Assoc. (lead)

Jonathan Butler

Julia Martinelli

 

 

 

Setting the highest standards for the Art Dinner at Laguna Gloria

Etherial location. Elegant crowd. Exquisite cuisine. Excellent art.

IMG_6786
The S.S. Hangover at Laguna Gloria. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

For the past five years, the Art Dinner at Laguna Gloria has benefited the Contemporary Austin. Hosts expertly employ the arboreal setting on the grounds of the Clara Driscoll villa to create an elevated atmosphere at dusk and into the evening. This year, that effort included the passage of the S.S. Hangover through the lagoon with members of an Austin music collective playing a dirge-like piece.

Visual and musical artists do love a bit of theater!

Guests were in no hurry to pass up cocktails at key points in and around the villa, but the seated dinner took place under tents on the front lawn. Happily, I was placed next to designers Lydia G. Cook and Geoff Fritz from the Cambridge, Mass. firm of Reed Hilderbrand Landscape Architecture. They helped explained the company’s master plan for the Contemporary’s Marcus Sculpture Park, including connectivity to nearby Mayfield Park.

IMG_6799
Scene from the Art Dinner at Laguna Gloria. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

RELATED: Imagine a new welcome at Laguna Gloria.

The modest but tasty dinner arrived courtesy of restaurateur Tyson Cole along with chefs Ed Sura of Uchiko and Joe Zoccoli of Uchi. (Note to other Austin charity hosts: You don’t need a big slab of animal protein to satisfy.) The evening climaxed with an unusually civilized live auction featuring work by artists close to projects at the Contemporary.

IMG_6795
Dr. Sam Rumi and Dr. Meena Vendal at the Art Dinner at Laguna Gloria. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

“When all was said and done, we raised more than $500,000 in the live and silent auctions,” reported the museum’s spokeswoman, Nicole Chism Griffin. “One hundred percent of these funds will go to support exhibitions at both of our locations. We also raised  $325,0000 toward the purchase of Ai Weiwei’s “Iron Tree Trunk.” Our goal had been $100,000 for the evening! This $325,000 will go toward fulfilling the Edward and Betty Marcus Foundation’s challenge grant of $500,000 (for the purchase).”

I hear that some guests danced till the wee hours.

IMG_6788
Andre Revilla and Rachel Imwalle at the Art Dinner at Laguna Gloria. Michael Barnes/American-Statesman

Austin Symphony

Some notes on the Austin Symphony‘s recent concert at the Long Center.

• One way to fill a house: Schedule Beethoven‘s Fifth. It is the duty of artistic leaders such as Peter Bay to expand tastes and lead audiences in new directions. Still, the Fifth — if well done, and it was — satisfies and enlightens with each fresh interpretation. It comes with the added benefit of a standing-room-only crowd.

RELATED: Why I adore the Austin Symphony.

• I’ve tried to sit in every part of the Long Center house since it opened 10 years ago. Row 4 on the orchestra level was not the right place to take in the concert’s opening piece, Michael Torke‘s “Bright Blue Music.” All I heard was the lower range of the strings and all I saw were the polished shoes of the musicians.

• Turns out the same seat was ideal for Leonard Bernstein‘s “Serenade (after Plato’s Symposium) for Solo Violin, Strings, Harp and Percussion.” Here, only the strings really mattered and they came together beautifully in conjunction with violinist Vadim Gluzman‘s playful then profound solo turn. Booked as part of the “Bernstein at 100” celebration, this near-concerto is a gem to revive more often.

• Bay has proven time and again that he can take epic forms to ever higher heights. Last season, it was Mahler‘s Sixth, an almost brutally difficult symphony to get right. With Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 in C Minor, the challenge instead is overfamiliarity. Bay and his always advancing ensemble treated the first movement with rhythmic clarity, the second with architectural balance, the third with taut force and the final movement with bristling brilliance.

Elgin’s Margo Sawyer wins Guggenheim Fellowship

Margo Sawyer, the Elgin-based artist whose art intersects sculpture and architecture, has won a coveted Guggenheim Fellowship.

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation recently announced 173 fellowships (including two joint fellowships) in arts and sciences for 2018. This honor comes with up to $45,000 to support one of the winners’ future projects.

“The Guggenheim Fellowship would allow me time and resources to cultivate designs of spaces transcendent,” Sawyer says. “Public places that foster contemplation.”

image1
Artist Margo Sawyer. Contributed

RELATED: Contemporary Austin collection to Blanton Museum.

Sawyer, 59, has been on the University of Texas art faculty for 30 years. For decades, she has transformed old brick structures in Elgin into multi-use arts spaces.

She is the niece of Harlem Renaissance painter Aaron Douglas and her father was one of the first African-Americans to serve in the U.S. diplomatic corps in the 1950s. He met her British mother in Accra, Ghana. Her grandfather founded the NAACP in Topeka, Kan. and helped initiate the legal action that became Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court decision that struck down school segregation.

Sawyer grew up the  U.S., U.K. and Cameroon. In 1973, her mother took her to Egypt during the Yom Kippur War.

“I was about 15 and it was an experience that made me the sculptor I am today,” Sawyer says. “We were the first and only 17 tourists allowed in the country. I spent 30 minutes alone in Tutankhamun’s tomb — an obsession as with many people ever since. The experience at Abu Simbel, where the monuments are carved into the living rock, a union of sculpture, architecture and painting united, has been my modus operandi all my life.”

Margo floor up
From Margo Sawyer’s recent solo show, ‘Reflect: Reflector,’ at the San Antonio Play House.

She is currently working on a glass colored spiral immersive sculpture for the U.S. Embassy in Kosovo.

“The viewer will be enveloped in a pool of color,” Sawyer says. “I just completed windows for a private chapel and also I’m working on a commission for the University of Houston all with hand-painted glass being made with Franz Mayer of Munich, who did the exquisite windows for Ellsworth Kelly‘s ‘Austin.”’

RELATED: Ellsworth Kelly’s ‘Austin’ worships light.

Sawyer realizes this is a big turning point during a long career of many achievements, including many works placed in private homes, museum collections and public spaces, along with wide recognition in the Austin arts community, including the Austin Critics Table designation as 2015 Artist of the Year.

“This is an amazing moment for me,” she says. “I have been making sculpture since I was 14 years old, and am honored that I have been a sculptor throughout my life. This year feels transformative and the recognition is monumental, a testament to the personal commitment and belief in the vision I have created.”

 

Get ready for Ellsworth Kelly at the Blanton Museum of Art

Top arts news of the week: UT opens Ellsworth Kelly masterpiece at the Blanton Museum of Art. Although museum members, directors and backers have peeked inside the chapel-like building on campus, everyone can see it during regular museum hours beginning Feb. 18. Check into the Visitors Services desk in the east wing of the museum first. And go on a sunny morning for the best light show.

READ a description of the place on our premium site MyStatesman.com.

The tumbling square windows fill one vault with pale light. Ralph Barrera/American-Statesman

“Patches of color drip ever so slowly down the walls, then pool onto the smooth black granite floor. On sunny days, the tall white barrel vaults swim with jewel-toned iridescence.

“Not only do the intense hues migrate minute by minute, they alter from day to day according to the position of the sun above “Austin,” a phenomenal new building that doubles as a monumental work of art on the University of Texas campus.”

Get a sneak peek inside Ellsworth Kelly’s stunning ‘Austin’ at UT

The much-anticipated opening of Ellsworth Kelly‘s’ “Austin,” a phenomenal new building that doubles as a monumental work of art on the University of Texas campus, is not until Feb. 18. But now we can give you a look inside.

RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Designed by late American modern artist Kelly, the $23 million project created by the Blanton Museum of Art instantly takes its place as a crown jewel of Austin art.

RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Scroll down to see more photos, read what some people are saying about the work and to find out how you can see “Austin” for yourself once it opens.

“It will be a bold new landmark for the university and the city,” predicts Blanton director Simone Wicha, who spent years putting together “Austin,” colloquially known as the “Ellsworth Kelly Building” or just “The Ellsworth” or sometimes “The Kelly.” “Inevitably, it will change the way the world sees Austin.”

RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

“Ellsworth Kelly’s ‘Austin’ culminates the career of one of the greatest of modern artists,” says Richard Shiff, an art professor who directs UT’s Center for the Study of Modernism. “Kelly conceived of (it) as a single aesthetic experience. ‘Austin’ is culture in a pure form. Its appeal is universal.”

“‘Austin’ not only showcases Kelly’s early appreciation of historical European art and architecture,” curator Carter Foster says, “it also marries this passion with the transformative themes that he would discover over the course of his life. I hope that, with the help of this exhibition, everyone who visits the work will come away with the same sense of awe that I do.”

RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

“The opening of ‘Austin’ further cements the Blanton as an international cultural destination,” Wicha says. “The broad geographic support we received for this project is reflective of the audience we anticipate visiting Kelly’s monumental achievement.”

RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

HOW TO SEE ‘AUSTIN’

Starting Feb. 18, Ellsworth Kelly’s ‘Austin’ will be open during regular Blanton hours; entry is included with museum admission. Go to the Visitors Services desk inside the museum’s east wing to obtain tickets. Find out more at blantonmuseum.org.

rbz Ellsworth Kelly 29.JPG