Critics name finalists for 2018 Austin arts awards

It’s time. The Austin Critics Table Awards nominations came out this morning.

Buzz Moran at the Critics Table Awards at Cap City Comedy Club in 2008. That’s a decade ago! Michael Barnes/AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

The gathered minds invented new categories, both under the heading of Theater: Periphery Company, recognizing the theatrical body of work by companies outside of Austin proper, and Improvised Production, recognizing mainstage projects by area improv troupes.

That puts the number of official categories this year at 29 (7 theater, 5 design, 5 dance, 6 classical music, 6 visual arts). Critics also promise at least 11 special citations.

RELATED: 2018 Austin Arts Hall of Fame honorees.

The ceremony is 7 p.m. June 4 at Cap City Comedy Club, 8120 Research. Admission is free. The public is welcome.

Logo for Austin Critics Table Award. By Michael Crampton for American-Statesman

AUSTIN CRITICS TABLE NOMINATIONS 2018

THEATER

Production

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, ZACH Theatre

Enron, UT Austin Department of Theatre & Dance

Henry IV, The Hidden Room Theatre

Pocatello, Street Corner Arts

Ragtime, Texas State University Department of Theatre and Dance

The Repentance of Saint Joan, Paper Chairs

The Wolves, Hyde Park Theatre

Direction

Jason Phelps, The Brothers Size

Rudy Ramirez, The Revolutionists/Storm Still/Wild Horses/The Way She Spoke: A Docu-Mythologia

kt shorb, Scheherazade

Dave Steakley, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Benjamin Summers, Pocatello

Dustin Wills, Catalina de Erauso

Hannah Wolf, Enron

David Mark Cohen New Play Award

Catalina de Erauso, Elizabeth Doss

Fixing Troilus and Cressida, Kirk Lynn

The Repentance of Saint Joan, Patrick Shaw

Scheherazade, Scheherazade ensemble

The Secretary, Kyle John Schmidt

A Shoe Story, Allen Robertson & Damon Brown

Wild Horses, Allison Gregory

Performance by an Individual

John Christopher, The Brothers Size/Fixing Troilus and Cressida

Crystal Bird Caviel, The Moors/Fixing Troilus and Cressida

Chanel, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill

Jennifer Coy Jennings, Wild Horses

Sarah Danko, The Effect/Grounded

Sam Domino, Prodigal Son

Judd Farris, Henry IV/The Repentance of Saint Joan

Joseph Garlock, The Immigrant

Bill Karnovsky, Yankee Tavern

Katie Kohler, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Robert Matney, Henry IV

Amber Quick, Pocatello/The Secretary

Performance by an Ensemble

A Chorus Line, Texas State University Department of Theatre and Dance

Catalina de Erauso, Paper Chairs

Enron, UT Austin Department of Theatre & Dance

Pocatello, Street Corner Arts

The Seafarer, City Theatre

Vampyress, Vortex Repertory Company

The Wolves, Hyde Park Theatre

Periphery Company

Gaslight Baker Theatre, Lockhart

Georgetown Palace Theatre, Georgetown

Fredericksburg Theater Company, Fredericksburg

Way Off Broadway Community Players, Leander

Wimberley Players, Wimberley

Improvised Production

The 48-Hour Improv Marathon: Hour 48, The Hideout Theatre

Broad Ambition, Girls Girls Girls

Deja Noir, ColdTowne Theater

The Kindness of Strangers, The Hideout Theatre

Latinauts: The Wrath of Juan, Prima Doñas

Orphans!, The Hideout Theatre

Speak No More, Golden

2018 Critics Table Awards June 4 jpg

DESIGN

Set

Stephanie Busing, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Chris Conard/Zac Thomas, Pocatello

Magdalena Jarkowiec, “In Here”

Lisa Laratta, Catalina de Erauso/The Repentance of Saint Joan

Roxy Mojica, Enron

Desiderio Roybal, The Father

Lino Toyos, The Drowsy Chaperone

Costume

Emily Cawood, “Fellow Travelers”/“Klein Blue (The Void)”

Jennifer Rose Davis, The Revolutionists

Cait Graham, Enron

E.L. Hohn, Catalina de Erauso

Buffy Manners, Shakespeare in Love

Cheryl Painter, The Moors

Barbara Pope, The Drowsy Chaperone

Lighting

Rachel Atkinson, Scheherazade/Twentyeight/Catalina de Erauso/The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time/con flama

Natalie George, 11:11:10/11:11:11/A Study in Release/Romeo and Juliet/There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe

Sarah EC Maines, In the Heights

Steven Myers, “Fellow Travelers”/”Murmuration”/“Klein Blue/The Void”

Stephen Pruitt, Parade/Juana: First (I) Dream/Glacier/Diet Fizz Radio/Bartholomew Swims

Alex Soto/Ilios Lighting, Belonging, Part One

Tony Tucci, Exit Wounds

Sound

Lowell Bartholomee, Grounded

Robert S. Fisher, The Moors/Wakey Wakey

William Meadows, Belonging, Part One

Robert Pierson & Dustin Wills, Catalina de Erauso

Drew Silverman, “A Meditation”

Jesse Wilson, with Brandon Guerra, John Clark Gable, and KIVI, Diet Fizz Radio

Digital

Lowell Bartholomee, The Effect/Wakey Wakey/The Repentance of Saint Joan/Grounded

Ashton Bennett Murphy, “Mirror”

Eliot Gray Fisher, “In the Ether”

Robert Mallin, Enron

DANCE

Concert

A Study in Release, The Illusory Impressions Project

Fall for Dance, Dance Repertory Theatre

First (I) Dream, A’lante Flamenco

Masters of Dance, Ballet Austin

Midsummer Offerings, Performa/Dance

Parade, Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company

(Re)current Unrest, Charles O. Anderson/Fusebox Festival

Short Work

“Finale,” Jennifer Sherburn

“Four Mortal Men,” Ballet Austin

“In Here,” Magdalena Jarkowiec/Fusebox Festival

“In the Ether,” Dance Repertory Theatre

“Murmuration,” Ballet Austin II

“Overseas Phone Call, 1987,” Magdalena Jarkowiec/Performa/Dance

“When,” Dance Repertory Theatre

Choreographer

Charles O. Anderson, (Re)current Unrest

Kathy Dunn Hamrick, Parade/Glacier

Rennie Harris, “Resurrection”

Jennifer Hart, “Fellow Travelers”/“Murmuration”

Taryn Lavery & Alex Miller, with Hailley Laurèn, Amy Myers, and Lucy Wilson, Diet Fizz Radio

Ray Eliot Schwartz, “Otras Puertas/Otras Rumbos”

Jennifer Sherburn, “Lapse”/”Finale”

Dancer

Charles O. Anderson, “(Re)current Unrest pt. 3: Clapback”

Ellen Bartel, “Attic”

Alexa Capareda, “Diet Fizz Radio”/”Overseas Phone Call, 1987”/”In Here”

Anika Jones, Belonging, Part One

Anuradha Naimpally, “Krishna the Divine Lover”

Rosalyn Nasky, “Come In!!!”/”Pod”/There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe

Kelsey Oliver, “Overseas Phone Call, 1987”/”In Here”

Oren Porterfield, “Fellow Travelers”

Emily Rushing, “Flicker.Burn.Repeat”

Jun Shen, Belonging, Part One

Ensemble

Exit Wounds/Masters of Dance, Ballet Austin

“Fellow Travelers,” Performa/Dance

“Otras Puertas/Otras Rumbos,” Fall for Dance

Parade, Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company

(Re)current Unrest, Charles O. Anderson/Fusebox Festival

“Resurrection,” Dance Repertory Theatre

There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe, ensemble

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Concert/Opera

Bach: Mass in B Minor, Panoramic Voices

Carmen, Austin Opera

La Clemenza di Tito: A Retelling, LOLA

Feast of Voices, Austin Symphony Orchestra with Chorus Austin

Southwest Voices, Chorus Austin

La Traviata, Austin Opera

Unclouded Day, Conspirare

Chamber Performance

Invoke, Beerthoven/Golden Hornet Smackdown IV

Golden Hornet Young Composers Concert, Golden Hornet

i/we, Austin Classical Guitar

It’s About Time: Companions, Texas Early Music Project

The Lavuta Project, Austin Chamber Music Festival

Virgo Veritas, Austin Chamber Music Center

Original Composition/Score

A Study in Release, Catherine Davis

Crone – for Chamber Orchestra, Samuel Lipman

i/we, Joseph V. Williams II

“Songs of Remembrance and Resistance,” Kevin March

Singer

Ryland Angel, Passio/It’s About Time: Companions

Cayla Cardiff, An Early Christmas/It’s About Time: Companions

Liz Cass, La Clemenza di Tito: A Retelling

Marina Costa-Jackson, La Traviata

Carolyn Hoehle, La Clemenza di Tito: A Retelling

Gitanjali Mathur, It’s About Time: Companions

Sandra Piques Eddy, Carmen

Heather Phillips, Carmen

Chad Shelton, Carmen

Jenifer Thyssen, An Early Christmas/It’s About Time: Companions/Complaints Through the Ages

Veronica Williams, “Songs of Remembrance and Resistance”

Ensemble

Aeolus Quartet, Virgo Veritas

Invoke, Beerthoven/Golden Hornet Smackdown IV

Tetractys, Golden Hornet Young Composers Concert

Instrumentalist

Bruce Colson, It’s About Time: Companions

Ian Davidson, Feast of Voices

Artina McCain, Black Composers Concert: The Black Female Composer

Carla McElhaney, Revel Classical Band at Beerthoven

Marcus McGuff, An Early Christmas

Ebonee Thomas, Black Composers Concert: The Black Female Composer

Bruce Williams, Feast of Voices

VISUAL ART

Solo Gallery Exhibition

“Anthony B. Creeden: Cacti and Semaphore,” GrayDuck Gallery

“Bucky Miller: Grackle Actions,” Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum

“Claude van Lingen: Timekeeper,” Co-Lab Projects

“Larry Bamburg: BurlsHoovesandShells on a Pedestal of Conglomerates,” UT Visual Arts Center

“Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons: Notes on Sugar,” Christian-Green Gallery

“Rachel Stuckey: Good Days and Bad Days on the Internet,” Women & Their Work

“Raul Gonzalez: Doing Work,” GrayDuck Gallery

Group Gallery Exhibition

“Collectors Show,” GrayDuck Gallery

“Good Mourning Tis of Thee,” Co-Lab Projects

“In depth: a group show,” Davis Gallery

“Refigured: Radical Realism,” Dougherty Arts Center

“Staycation 2: What in the World?” Mass Gallery

“xoxo,” Museum of Human Achievement

“Yo soy aqui / I am here,” ICOSA

Museum Exhibition

“Rodney McMillian: Against a Civic Death,” The Contemporary Austin

“Line Form Color,” Blanton Museum of Art

“The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip,” Blanton Museum of Art

“Vaudeville,” Ransom Center

“Wangechi Mutu,” The Contemporary Austin

Independent Project

2017 Texas Biennial

Cage Match Project Gallery

The Museum of Pocket Art

Outsider Fest

Gallery, Body of Work

Co-Lab Projects

Dimension Gallery

GrayDuck gallery

Mass Gallery

Museum of Human Achievement

Artist

Jennifer Balkan

Elizabeth Chiles

Michael Anthony Garcia

Revi Meicler

Barry Stone

 

Get an early look at what’s coming up at Creek Show 2018

Creek Show, the annual procession of light art staged by the Waller Creek Conservancy, turned a corner of sorts last year.

What started as mostly elegant minimalist efforts along downtown Austin’s eastern waterway went maximalist in 2017 with masses of pink flags for “Night Garden” by Daniel Woodroffe (lead), Kim Harding, Francisco Rosales, Ethan Primm and Kevin Sullivan.

UPDATE: Credits for “Night Garden” appeared incorrectly in a previous version of this post.

“Night Garden” was a hit for the Creek Show in 2017. Created by Daniel Woodroffe (lead), Kim Harding, Francisco Rosales, Ethan Primm and Kevin Sullivan. Contributed by DWG via creekshow.com

The designs for year five — the free event will be Nov. 9-17 — were recently announced and promise to continue the large-scale experience. In 2017, more than 20,000 people attended Creek Show, sampling the kind of attractions planned for a transformed Waller Creek. For 2018, Creek Show will be in a different section of Waller Creek — between Ninth and 11th streets — and include Symphony Square, where the “Creek Show Lounge” will be located.

Here’s a look at early renderings of what’s planned for 2018, along with the teams behind the designs:

“Tentsion”

By Perkins + Will

Chet Morgan, Assoc. (lead)

Jenny Adair

Caitlin Admire

Aaron Manns

Emilie Ogburn

Ellen Saathoff

Paul Ward

“Ambedo βeta”

By Polis

Daniel Goodwin (lead)

Brianna Graves

Olivia Nguyen

Bruce Wilcoxon

“Parabolus”

By aod

Jose Roberto Corea (lead)

Courtney Jones Burton

Gretchen Leigh Du Pré

Jeff Fletcher

“Light Lines”

By Campbell Landscape Architecture + Tab Labs

Cameron Campbell (lead)

Bill Baird

Taurin Barrera

Stuart Campbell

Jenny Janis

Viddhi Jhaveri

“La Noria”

By Drophouse Design

Christian Klein (lead)

Matt Satter

Christy Taylor

“Urban Scrim”

By Lemmo Architecture and Design

Ryan Lemmo, (lead)

Stephanie Lemmo, Assoc. (lead)

Jonathan Butler

Julia Martinelli

 

 

 

H-E-B names popular Long Center City Terrace

It’s one of the most charismatic spots in the city — the Long Center City Terrace.

Bubblepalooza is among the countless events staged at what will be the H-E-B Terrace at the Long Center. Suzanne Cordeiro for American-Statesman

From the day that the performing arts center opened in 2008 — that’s right, almost 10 years ago — the semi-circular procession of columns left over from the old Palmer Auditorium made a powerful people magnet.

The view of the downtown skyline is priceless, even after the addition of some south shore buildings that cut off the view to the east. Instantly, everyone needed portraits on that terrace. Festivals and concerts followed. Pre-show, intermission and after-show crowds lingered there above a grassy hill.

At certain points, the whole area around it has been transformed into the Statesman Skyline Theater.

RELATED: Long Center’s new outdoor venue will be named Statesman Skyline Theater

So a naming opportunity for the terrace, right? H-E-B, one of the most munificent corporate citizens in Texas, has stepped up to the plate with five-year naming agreement for an undisclosed amount of money. Say hello to the H-E-B Terrace.

The name change will be made official at 9:30 a.m. Nov. 24, to be followed from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.  by a free holiday event dubbed “Santa on the Terrace.”

“Our collaboration with  H-E-B has been very valuable to the Long Center and the city of Austin,” says Cory Baker, president and CEO of the center. “Their dedication to the community and to providing access to the arts is something we both feel passionately about.”

The H-E-B Terrace comes with an arc of columns, a broad plaza, a grassy hill and unbeatable views of downtown Austin. Suzanne Cordeiro for American-Statesman

“We are thrilled to be able to strengthen our partnership with the Long Center as we share in the belief that arts are an integral part of building a strong community, understanding our diversity, preserving our history, and building our future,” says Jeff Thomas, H-E-B senior vice-president and general manager for the Central Texas region. “The H-E-B Terrace is the ideal community gathering place for these beliefs to intersect – it is the heart of the Austin arts district and welcomes everyone to experience art in a public way.”

(This post has been updated to correct a date.)

 

Today’s hires, fires, gifts and honors in Austin arts

We lied. This post reports on no firings. You can relax.

Yet “hires, fires, gifts and honors” sounds like a good catch-all headline. We might use it again.

Zilker Theatre Productions makes two key hires

The group that has staged the Zilker Summer Musical for 60 years has taken on J. Robert “Jimmy” Moore as artistic director. Moore, remembered recently for “Buyer and Cellar” at Zach Theatre, will work alongside Executive Director Kate Hix, already in place. Also, one of those beloved behind-the-scenes heroes, Shannon Richey, has been drafted as director of production. Moore and Richey are trusted veterans who will undoubtedly bolster this free and singularly Austin tradition. No word on next summer’s selection.

J. Robert Moore is now artistic director for Zilker Theatre Productions. Contributed

RELATED: Moore joins the Brotherhood of Barbra.

Austin Opera elects new board chairman

Arts benefactors Gail and Jeff Kodosky. Contributed by Becky Delgado

Austin Opera‘s board of trustees has designated Jeff Kodosky, founder of National Instruments and inveterate arts lovers, as its next chairman. He takes over the position from Elisabeth Waltz, who has served as chairwoman 2016. Kodosky has been with the board and the company through thick and thin since 1996. I’m sure this quiet, smiling man could tell some tales about the group that almost went away at least twice, but also has triumphed repeatedly. Next up is “Carmen” in November.

Huston-Tillotson is now an all-Steinway school. Contributed

Huston-Tillotson is now an all-Steinway school

Following a gift of $800,000, Huston-Tillotson University will become the only institution of higher learning in Central Texas, the fourth historically black college or university in the country, and the 196th college or university to join the All-Steinway School club. University officials will unveil the Steinway pianos during their Charter Day Convocation 10 a.m. Oct. 27, 2017 in the King-Seabrook Chapel on the campus at 900 Chicon Street. In addition, Steinway artist Marcus Roberts and the Marcus Roberts Trio will headline a special concert.

Tracy Bonfitto is the Ransom Center’s new curator of art. Contributed by Pete Smith

Ransom Center selects new curator of art

Austinites generally think of the Ransom Center as a literary treasure trove with out-of this-world strengths in modern literature, movies, performing arts and photography. And, oh yes, the Watergate papers. Yet is also houses, preserves and exhibits a lot of excellent visual art, too. Over the summer, Tracy Bonfitto was named curator of art. She comes with sterling credentials from Getty Research Institute, the Fowler Museum at UCLA and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. She’s also a University of Texas grad.

I’m sure she will meld partnerships with the other distinguished and closely related cultural spots in that area of Austin, including the Blanton Museum of Art, LBJ Presidential Library, Briscoe Center for American History and Bullock Texas State History Museum as well as UT’s highly regarded Landmarks public arts program and its Visual Arts Center. Maybe the new Ellsworth Kelly house will help point the way visually and viscerally for more of a interrelated cultural campus.

Help build a cool Patrick Dougherty sculpture in Pease Park

What a rush: Pease Park Conservancy has put out a call for volunteers to help build a major sculpture in the park in January 2018.

Patrick Dougherty’s “Easy Rider” (2010). Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, D.C. Contributed by Andy Lynch

Designed by renowned artist Patrick Dougherty, this will be the latest Stickwork, a series of over 275 distinct sculptures around the world.

According to a Pease Park communiqué, it will take about three weeks to build the site-specific piece – comprised entirely of locally harvested saplings – which is intentionally built for the community by the community.

“Volunteers are needed for single day shifts, although if the project really gels with the right person they are welcome to help out for longer,” says spokesman Mason Kerwick. “Since Patrick will be on site every day guiding the shape of the piece, this is the perfect opportunity for anyone curious to learn more about the artistic process of an internationally renowned artist – while also spending time outdoors, enjoying the sunshine and nature in one of Austin’s oldest park.

Once complete, the sculpture will remain on display in Pease Park for a few years.

 

Timely play about Trump Era makes it to UT

A 90-minute drama about America after an envisioned President Donald Trump impeachment opens at the University of Texas on Wednesday. A public conversation follows on Sept. 7.

SEE FULL STORY HERE.

David Sitler plays Rick and Franchelle Stewart Dorn plays Gloria in “Building the Wall.” Contributed by Lawrence Peart

Here’s a peek at my story about Robert Schenkkan‘s “Building the Wall.” —

As timely as the latest political scandal, “Building the Wall” issued like a blaze of lighting from the mind of Robert Schenkkan, the Tony Award- and Pulitzer Prize-winning author who grew up in Austin.

The 90-minute, two-person drama about America after an envisioned impeachment of President Donald Trump has its regional premiere at the University of Texas on Thursday and runs through Sept. 10. A public conversation will take place on Sept. 7 at the Brockett Theatre.

Not that long ago, “Building the Wall” was barely a sketch of an idea in Schenkkan’s mental notebook. Yet possessed by the play’s force, he wrote it expeditiously in October, just before the presidential election.

Multiple theaters picked it up immediately, and it reached New York on May 24, which in theatrical terms is like an overnight turnaround. That run was short-lived, but a Los Angeles version was extended several times, and other productions have opened or are in rehearsals around the world.

“I felt the moment was urgent,” Schenkkan says. “It was good to see that as an artist I could respond quickly and that my community would join me. I met so many different artists at different theaters all over the country, institutions I didn’t know, or only knew by reputation, and everybody who participated in this did so with tremendous enthusiasm and excitement because they, too, felt the urgency of the moment and the need to do something, to respond to this extraordinary political crisis.”

Salute the late Boyd Vance at city hall

I recall a downtown Austin leadership luncheon near the turn of the century that was populated chiefly by men and women in business suits. Out pops performer Boyd Vance — lithe, fearless, radiant, scampy — to sing an adapted version of “Hello, Dolly,” as if he were positioned at the top of a staircase dressed in red sequins and flanked by a dozen men in show tuxedos. At various points, he sat in the laps of men and women to sing directly to them.

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Boyd Vance in 2004. Matt Rourke/American-Statesman

Nobody else could have done that.

Austinites remember Vance, a graduate of St. Stephen’s Episcopal School and the University of Texas, for many things. His undeniable charisma. His unforgettable performances. His leadership of the African-American arts community. And more.

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Boyd Vance, then artistic director of ProArts, introduces members of the David Chenu Trio in 2004. Amber Novak for the American-Statesman

No wonder when the new Carver Museum and Cultural Center opened in East Austin, its lively little theater was named after Vance. He died in 2005 at age 47.

Around 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 22, the Austin City Council will salute Vance’s memory with a proclamation. Now you know that the timing of these honors is never exact — I recently accepted one in the name of the Austin Critics Table and heard first some thoroughly fascinating speeches on plumbing regulations and flood abatement — but I imagine the scene will be something like Old Home Week in chambers. All are welcome.

The warm, loving, slightly boozy embrace of the Austin Critics Table Awards

The Austin Critics Table Awards ceremony was long. Very long. A record four hours at Cap City Comedy Club.

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Yet the 25th anniversary celebration of all things arts might have been the best one ever. Because every minute was a warm, loving, slightly boozy embrace between artists and the writers who cover them.

I loved every tribute from the critics and (almost) every enthusiastic and authentic acceptance speech. (Why do some people choose a moment of honor to be mean?) Bonus: a witty proclamation from Austin Mayor Steve Adler for the occasion

RELATED: Behold: The Austin Critics Table Awards nominees

Some people — well, a lot of people — left early. But then they missed the best acceptance speech of the evening, given by Christine Hoang, who shared the David Mark Cohen New Play Award with Lisa Thompson, and who talked about how each word from her reviews reduced her “imposter anxiety,” and whose bilingual play, “A Girl Named Sue,” represented a social and cultural leap for the descendants of Vietnamese refugees and their families.

The big news, however, was the expansion of the Critics Table to 20 members including web-based writers, a move I’ve strongly supported for years. The Table began with just five of us newspapermen, sole survivor Robert Faires reminded us — I no longer vote — and over the years has included more than 50 writers.

AUSTIN CRITCS TABLE AWARDS 2016-2017

W.H. “Deacon” Crain Award for Student Work: Madison Williams, Emily Ott

Lighting Design: Jason Amato (“Atlantis: A Puppet Opera”), Patrick Anthony (“A Perfect Robot,” “Old Times”)

Group Gallery Exhibition: “The First Horizons of Juno: Christina Coleman, Jane Hugentober, Candice Lin, Karen Lofgren, Christine Rebet, Alice Wang and Chantal Wnuk,” Mass Gallery

Museum Exhibition: “Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser,” Blanton Museum of Art

Singer: Donnie Ray Albert (“The Manchurian Candidate,” “I Too: The Voices of Langston Hughes”), Liz Cass (“Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance”), David Adam Moore (“The Manchurian Candidate”), Paul Sanchez (“Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance,” “A Christmas Carol”)

Chamber Performance: “I, Too: The Voices of Langston Hughes,” Living Paper Song Project

Original Composition/Score: “Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance,” Graham Reynolds & Lagartijas Tirades al Sol

Scenic Design: Chris Conard (“Totalitarians,” “The Drowning Girls”), Desiderio Roybal (“Clybourn Park,” “The Price,” “The Herd”)

Short Work, Dance: “Camille: A Story of Art and Love,” Jennifer Hart

Solo Gallery Exhibition: “Tammie Rubin: Before I Knew You, I Missed You,” De Stijl Podium for Art

Artist: Deborah Roberts

Costume Design: Susan Branch Towne (“One Man, Two Guv’nors,” “The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui”)

Dancer: Alexa Caparedo (“Tikling(bird),” “Loose Gravel”), Amy Morrow (“Hiraeth,” “We’ve Been Here Before”)

Ensemble Dance: Dance Repertory Theatre (“Momentum”)

Gallery, Body of Work: “Museum of Human Achievement”

Independent Project: “Workout with Erica Nix,” Erica Nix

Ensemble, Classical: Schumann Chamber Players

Classical Concert/Opera: “The Manchurian Candidate,” Austin Opera

Sound Design: Lowell Bartholomee, “Clybourne Park,” “Fahrenheit 451”

Direction: Jenny Lavery (“The Drowning Girls”), Lily Wolff (“Lungs”)

Dance Concert: “Las Cuatro Estaciones: A Story of Human Trees,” Sharon Marroquin, produced by Latino Art Residency Project, Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center

Choreographer: Lisa Nicks, “Dear Johnny, in Response to Your Last Letter”

Digital Design: Greg Emetaz, “The Manchurian Candidate”

David Mark Cohen New Play Award: “A Girl Named Sue” (Christine Hoang), “Underground” (Lisa Thompson)

Ensemble, Theater: “Nevermore: The Imaginary Life and Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe,” Doctuh Mistah Productions

Actor: Liz Beckham (“Lungs,” Neva,” “Clybourne Park), Chase Brewer (“Hand to God”), Michael Joplin (“Lungs”), Amber Quick (“One Man, Two Guv’nors,” “Charlotte’s Web,” “The Herd”)

Production, Theater: Clybourne Park (Penfold Theatre), “The Drowning Girls” (Theatre en Bloc), “The Great Society (Zach Theatre)

Special Citations: Luis Armando Ortiz Gutierrez, Jeanne Claire van Ryzin, Andrea Ariel, Babs George, “Rambunctious,” Jennifer Sherburn for “11:11,” Theatre Synesthesia, Sandy Yamamoto, Thr3e Zisters,” Amy Downing.

Austin Arts Hall of Fame: Katherine Brimberry and Mark L. Smith, Zell Miller III, Kate Warren

UPDATE: Thanks to Robert Faires for correcting some embarrassing typos in names banged out quickly this morning.

Giving City toasts Austin Critics Table Awards

If you missed the short history of the Austin Critics Table Awards written by Monica Maldonado Williams of Giving City and published in Sunday’s American-Statesman, below find a snippet. The free awards ceremony returns 7 p.m. June 5 at Cap City Comedy Club.

MF -CRITICS
The Austin Critics Table in in 1995. L-R: John Bustin, Barry Pineo, Michael Barnes, Jamie Smith Cantara, Belinda Acosta, David Mark Cohen, Jerry Conn and Robert Faires. (Bustin and Cohen are deceased.) Mark Fort/American-Statesman

FULL STORY:  At 25 years old, an arts awards event learns to adapt.

“While almost all Austin arts organizations operate as nonprofits, the caliber of the art has become more professional and innovative, said co-founder Robert Faires. To reflect the range of art, this year’s Critics Table judges have adjusted the categories to make them less theater-heavy.

“There’s more diversity among the artists and the art forms in Austin, but this is not just a participation award,” said David Wyatt, a long-time volunteer for the event and the owner of a public relations agency that specializes in the art organizations. “Artists have to wait years to the point where they’ve developed their craft and matured as an artists to get recognized. It’s very meaningful.”

RELATED: See this year’s nominees for the Austin Critics Table Awards.

“In addition to adjusting the categories, Faires has had to adjust the roster of judges. As the last of the founders participating, he realized that the awards should include the new breed of art writers, especially those who publish primarily online. This year’s judges include writers from websites and blogs like Broadway World Austin, Austin Entertainment Weekly, Arts & Culture Texas, and Conflict of Interest TX.”

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Monica Maldonado Williams. Ricardo B. Brazziell/American-Statesman

BACKGROUND: Monica Maldonado Williams cracks the charity code.

See how artists will light up Waller Creek this year

The Waller Creek Conservancy has announced its 2017 line-up for the light-based  “Creek Show.” Now in its fourth year, the jam of artworks employs the spacey spaces of the creek bed and banks to illuminate its potential as a destination park. The family-friendly sequence will run Nov. 10-18.

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The six planned light shows for 2017. Contributed by Waller Creek Conservancy

Here go the artists and their planned art:

“No Lifeguard on Duty” by Asakura Robinson

“Fotan Fable” by HA Architecture

“Night Garden” by dwg

“Ephemeral Suspension” by Pathos + TouchTo

“Blind Spot” by Two+ Collaborative

“Submerge” by Davey McEarthron Architecture + Studio Lumina + Drophouse

RELATED: Creek Show preview 2016.