Austin plans jubilee weekend for playwright Terrence McNally.

Terrence McNally, who grew up in Corpus Christi, ranks among the top two or three playwrights from Texas. In Austin, the Ransom Center at the University of Texas holds his papers, while Zach Theatre has become something of the official home for performances of his plays and musicals.

Distinguished playwright Terrence McNally. Contributed by Michael Nagle.

The two groups have teamed up to salute McNally on his 80th birthday with a weekend of activities.

Nov. 10: Theater backers and producers Carolyn and Marc Seriff give a special dinner for the playwright at their home.

Nov. 11: The Texas Union Theater will screen “Every Act of Life,” a documentary about McNally’s life. Zach artistic director Dave Steakley will interview the playwright from the stage afterwards. A reception will follow at the Ransom Center.

RELATED: ‘Ragtime’ is an American classic.

Nov. 12: Zach will present a birthday gala performance that will include actors Richard Thomas, F. Murray Abraham and John Glover. They will highlight the McNally’s career which includes Tony Award wins for “Love! Valour! Compassion!,” “Master Class,” “Kiss of the Spider Woman” and “Ragtime.”

To RSVP and purchase tickets, visit www.zachtheatre.org/mcnally

Bloomberg Philanthropies rewards 26 Austin cultural groups with grants

[cmg_anvato video=3925636 autoplay=”true”]

Bloomberg Philanthropies has named 26 Austin cultural groups that will receive significant grants as well as management training as part of a $43 million second-wave campaign to strengthen small-to-medium-sized American arts nonprofits.

The charitable foundation — established by businessman and former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg — chose the groups by invitation only in selective cities.

“It was a complete shock,” said Ron Berry, artistic director of Austin recipient Fusebox Festival. “I was in the office reading an article about how Bloomberg was expanding into our region and remarked to the team about how exciting that was, and then we got an email from them about five minutes later.”

Sylvia Orozco, executive director of the Mexic-Arte Museum, is as thrilled with the grant now as she was with her group’s first in 1984. Daulton Venglar/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

“The arts inspire people, provide jobs and strengthen communities,” Bloomberg said in a statement. “This program is aimed at helping some of the country’s most exciting cultural organizations reach new audiences and expand their impact.”

In May, Austin was named alongside Atlanta, Baltimore, Denver, New Orleans, Pittsburgh and Washington D.C. to receive a second round of Bloomsberg grants valued at $43 million. Rare for this type of giving, the money is intended to cover operational expenses rather than specific programs.

RELATED: We salute $43 million in Bloomberg arts gifts.

“We wanted to reach cities that we thought had a really strong mix in the way they were serving up arts and culture,” Kate Levin, who oversees arts programs for Bloomberg, told the New York Times in May.

Previously, the program had given $65 million to smaller groups in New York, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

In response to the news, Austin arts leaders talked about immediate needs, such as rent or replacement facilities and equipment, but also longer term strategies like marketing and development.

Pianist Michelle Schumann said: ‘The grant comes with a wealth of consulting services and access to experts in the fields of marketing and development.’ Contributed

“Because our building has been sold, we must move in two years,” said Chris Cowden, longtime leader of Women & Their Work Gallery.”We have decided that, to avoid ever higher rents and the instability that brings, we must buy a building. Since the Bloomberg grant is earmarked for operating expenses, money that we would normally have to use for rent and salaries can now be set aside in a fund that will be used to buy that building.”

Finding new audiences is a high priority for long-established groups that have not reached their potential in the community.

“We are investing most of the funds into marketing because that is what we believe will make the strongest impact,” said Ann Ciccolella, artistic director of Austin Shakespeare. “I am personally thrilled! It’s taken a long time to get to a $500,000 budget and now it’s time for growth. With so many arts groups in the city learning new tactics together, I am hoping for powerful results.”

For some groups, the grant money takes a back seat to training. Bloomberg’s arts innovation and management program was devised by DeVos Institute of Arts Management at the University of Maryland.

“The grant comes with a wealth of consulting services and access to experts in the fields of marketing and development,” said Michelle Schumann, artistic director of the Austin Chamber Music Center. “I’m really thrilled to have the opportunity to ‘up our game.’”

The Bloomberg group instructs recipients to keep mum about the gift amounts, but an informal poll suggests that the grants equal 10 percent of their existing operating budgets.

“I am pumped,” said Jenny Larson, one of Salvage Vanguard Theater‘s artistic directors. “This funding could not have come at a better time for us. Being in a place of transition with the venue and staff has made us feel off balance. This support gives me hope and confidence that over the next two years we can create a solid foundation for SVT to continue to grow from.”

What do local arts leaders want to do with the windfall?

“Everything!” said  Lara Toner Haddock, artistic director of Austin Playhouse. “Seriously there’s always a huge wish list of what we could do with extra funds. An unrestricted grant is so welcome.”

“I am as thrilled and excited as I remember being when we received our first grant ever in 1984,” said Sylvia Orozco, head of the Mexic-Arte Museum. “I am glowing! When you are young and daring, you believe you can do anything and accomplish everything you dream of. That’s how I felt then and that is how I again feel now.”

26 Austin cultural groups will receive Bloomberg Philanthropies grants

Allison Orr Dance (Forklift Danceworks)

Anthropos Arts

Austin Chamber Music Center

Austin Classical Guitar Society

Austin Creative Alliance

Austin Film Festival

Austin Film Society

Austin Music Foundation

Austin Opera

Austin Playhouse

Austin Shakespeare

Big Medium

Center For Women & Their Work

Chorus Austin

Conspirare

Creative Action

Esquina Tango Cultural Society

Fusebox Festival

Mexic-Arte Museum

Penfold Theatre Company

Puerto Rican Folkloric Dance

Roy Lozano Ballet Folklorico De Texas

Rude Mechs

Salvage Vanguard Theater

Telling Project

Vortex Repertory Company

UPDATE:  Lara Toner Haddock’s name was missing from this story in an earlier post.

Dates set for 2019 Texas Medal of Arts Awards

The Texas Cultural Trust, an advocacy group, has set the dates for its next celebrity-sated Texas Medal of Arts Awards ceremony. The multi-part fandango — which is also intended to update state leaders on cultural funding — will take place Feb. 26-27 at the Blanton Museum of ArtLong Center for the Performing Arts and elsewhere in Austin.

Texas Medal of Arts dates set. A-List/Austin360

The group has had no trouble attracting big names — from Willie Nelson and Eva Longoria to Walter Cronkite and Debbie Allen — to the event. The most recent blow-out at Bass Concert Hall in 2017 was a highlight of the social season.

RELATED: Soaking up the glamour of Texas Medal of Arts.

The new event co-chairs are Leslie Blanton from the world of cultural philanthropy and Leslie Ward from the corporate (AT&T) halls of external and legislative affairs.

The group, now overseen by Executive Director Heidi Marquez Smith, has given out 108 medals since 2001 when the initial class of honorees was assembled at the Paramount Theatre. The evolving list of categories: music, film, dance, visual arts, arts patron (corporate, foundation and individual), media/multimedia, television, architecture, theatre, arts education, literary arts, design, and lifetime achievement.

 

David Bowie tribute and a concert of freedom songs among shows coming up

You already know which Broadway musicals are coming to Austin’s Bass Concert Hall next season — yes, including “Hamilton” — but unless you attended the onstage party last night, you don’t know about the rest of the Texas Performing Arts season.

Related: Broadway smash”Hamilton” part of 2018-2019 season.

‘Amarillo’ from Teatro Linea de Sombra. Contributed by Sophie Garcia

The University of Texas presenting group’s director, Kathy Panoff, who reports that subscriptions for the Broadway in Austin series are unsurprisingly strong, cheerfully introduced the dance, classical, world and other Essential Series selections to several dozen fans. Then she introduced Stephanie Rothenberg, a member of the Broadway cast of “Anastasia,” who sang two numbers from the show. Reminder: Among the name producers for this stage version of the animated movie are local backers Marc and Carolyn Seriff.

(I wondered if the Austin group flew in talented Rothenberg and indeed they had, just for two songs. She’s a “swing” member of the New York cast, which means she can take over several parts, including the title role, but also could fly away for the night.)

Without any further delay …

2018-2019 Texas Performing Arts Season

Voca People. Contributed by Trambarin Yan

Sept. 12: Voca People. An a cappella group from Israel completely reconfigures popular hits.

Sept. 14: Reduced Shakespeare Company. The original creators of “The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged) (Revised)” bring back the hilarious work that made them famous.

Sept. 21: Fred Hersch Trio. Ten-time Grammy nominated pianist brings the real jazz deal.

Sept. 28: Taylor Mac. Extravagant drag performer messes with the audiences during “A 24-Decade History of Popular Music (Abridged).”

Oct. 5: Yekwon Sunwoo. UT likes to book the top talent from the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition and this is the 2017 winner.

Ragamala Dance Company performs “Written in Water.” Contributed by Bruce Palmer

Oct. 18: Ragamala Dance Company. It’s hard to believe this is the first major Indian dance troupe to play Bass, but I’m pretty sure that’s what Panoff said. They’ll perform “Written in Water.”

Nov. 1: “Blackstar: An Orchestral Tribute to David Bowie.” Lots of excitement about this take on the great man.

Nov. 8: Jordi Savall. Early music promoter returns to Austin, this time with a global vision in “The Routes of Slavery.”

Nov. 9: Pavel Urkiza and Congri Ensemble. The Cuban guitarist and composer interprets classic Cuban songs in “The Root of the Root.”

Drag performer Taylor Mac digs into the history of music. Contributed

Nov. 13: Circa. Australian contemporary circus troupe presents “Humans.”

Nov. 14-Dec. 2. “The Merchant of Venice.” There’s usually one or two selections from UT’s department of theater and dance in the bill; this season it’s a take on Shakespeare.

Nov. 16: “Private Peaceful.” Verdant Productions and Pemberley produced this staging of Michael Morpurgo’s book on World War I, directed and adapted for the stage by Simon Reade.

Jan. 30: Michelle Dorrance Dance. Trust UT to bring in the best of the dance world; this tap troupe introduces “ETM: Double Down.”

Feb. 5: Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet. This sliver of the storied orchestra was founded in 1988.

Terence Blanchard collaborates with Rennie Harris Puremovement Dance Company. Contributed by Henry Adebonojo

Feb. 8: “Songs of Freedom.” Drummer Ulysses Owns, Jr. leads a group interpreting Joni Mitchell, Abbey Lincoln and Nina Simone as part of the center’s series on protest arts.

March 27: “A Thousand Thoughts.” The Kronos Quartet team with Oscar-nominaed filmmaker Sam Green for this live documentary.

April 11: “Caravan: A Revolution on the Road.” A collaboration between Terence Blanchard E-Collective and Rennie Harris Puremovement Dance Company with projections and installations by Andrew Scott.

April 13: UT Jazz Orchestra with Joe Lovano. American saxophonist joins the college ensemble as part of the Butler School of Music’s Longhorn Jazz Festival.

April 11: Trey McLaughlin and Sounds of Zamar. They saved the blessing for last with this Georgia-based gospel group.

Your input needed for Texas Medal of Arts Awards

Since 2001, the Texas Cultural Trust, an advocacy group, has been honoring our state’s luminaries through the Texas Medal of Arts. The laurels are bestowed every other year at one of the most glamorous galas in Texas. The most recent one in 2017 at Bass Concert Hall was a blow-out.

John Paul and Eloise DeJoria win a 2017 Texas Medal of Arts Award for their corporate philanthropy with Patron and Paul Mitchell. Contributed.

RELATED: What the arts mean to great Texas artists and patrons.

Now the Trust wants your input.

Send your nominations in by April 5, 2018 for the February 2019 edition of the honors. Categories include architecture, arts education, arts patron (corporate, foundation or individual), dance, design, film, lifetime achievement, literary arts, media/multimedia, music, television, theater and visual arts.

RELATED: Soaking up the glamour of Texas Medal of Arts.

For a complete list of past honorees, go here. The 2017 winners included Eloise and John Paul DeJoria with Paul Mitchell/Patron, Kris Kristofferson, Lynn Wyatt, Lauren Anderson, Yolanda Adams, Renee Elise Goldsberry, Tobin Endowmen, Dallas Black Dance Theatre, Leo Villareal, Frank Welch, John Phillip Santos, Scott Pelley and Kenny Rogers.

Hurricane Harvey inspires a Broadway response in Houston

Just returned from Houston. My large family’s experience with Hurricane Harvey mirrored the wide range felt by other Houstonians. Some weathered heavy damage; others helped out those in need.

Contributed by UPI

You probably have already seen this video, but at least two of my siblings’ neighborhoods looked a lot like this. Or worse. But how clever of someone to see piles of debris and think of the barricades in “Les Miserables.” This sync is rough, touching, big-hearted and a little fun.

The best possible list so far for the Austin arts season

We are assembling the best possible preview list for the coming Austin arts season. This is what we have been able to gather so far.

Austin Chamber Music Center

Various locations, 512-454-0026, austinchambermusic.org

Sept. 22-23: Dvorak, Gershwin, Amy Beach

Nov. 17-18: Bizet, Mendelssohn, Borodin

Jan. 19-20, 2018: Mozart, Schubert, Mendelssohn

March 2-3, 2018: Ravel, Chopin, Piazzolla

April 6-7, 2018: Bach, Haydn, Rachmaninov

Austin History Center

810 Guadalupe St., 512-974-7480, library.austintexas.gov

Aug. 29, 2017-Jan. 28, 2018: “Austin at Midcentury: Photographs of Dewey Mears”

Aug. 15-Nov. 17: “Fehr & Granger, Architects: Austin Modernists” (Austin Center for Architecture)

Austin Opera

Long Center, 512-472-5992, austinopera.org

Nov. 11-19: “Carmen”

Jan. 27-Feb. 4, 2018: “Ariadne auf Naxos”

April 28-May 6, 2018: “La Traviata”

Austin Playhouse

6001 Airport Blvd., 512-476-0084, austinplayhouse.com

Sept. 1-24: “This Random World”

Dec. 1-23: “Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley”

Jan. 5-28, 2018: “The Immigrant”

March 23-April 22, 2018: “Shakespeare in Love”

May 25-June 24: “Curtains”

Austin Shakespeare

Long Center, 512-474-5664, thelcongcenter.org

Sept. 21-24: “The Crucible”

Nov. 16-Dec. 3: “Much Ado About Nothing”

Feb. 1-Feb. 25, 2018: “The Seagull”

May 3-27, 2018: “Merry Wives of Windsor” (Zilker)

The Austin Symphony will play along with Disney’s ‘Fantasia.’ Contributed

Austin Symphony

Long Center, 512-476-6064, austinsymphony.org

Sept. 8-9: Mozart, Poulenc

Oct. 6-7: Vaughan Williams, Beethoven, Mahler-Britten, Bruckner

Oct 20: Disney’s “Fantasia” in concert

Oct. 29: Halloween Children’s Concert

Dec. 1-2: Prokofiev, “Beyond the Score”

Dec. 12: Handel’s “Messiah”

Dec. 29-30: “I Heart the ’80s”

Jan. 12-13, 2018: Stravinsky, Rossini, Bach, Hovhaness, Haydn

Feb. 9, 2018: “Jurassic Park” in concert

Feb. 23-24, 2018: Schumann, MacDowell

March 23-24, 2018: Saint-Saëns, Jongen

April 12-14, 2018: Bernstein, Torke, Beethoven

May 18-19, 2018: Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, Rachmaninoff

Jun 1-2, 2018: “The Rat Pack: 100 Years of Frank”

June 16, 2018: Butler Texas Young Composers Concert

Austin Symphonic Band

Various locations. austinsymphonicband.org

Sept. 17: Fall Concert in the Park

Nov. 12: Indoor Concert No. 1

Feb. 11, 2018: Indoor Concert No. 2

April 8, 2018: Indoor Concert No. 3

May 13, 2018: Mother’s Day Concert

June 17, 2018: Father’s Day Concert

June 30, 2108: Bastrop Patriotic Festival

July 4, 2018: July Fourth Frontier Days Celebration

Ballet Austin

Long Center, 512-476-9151, balletaustin.org

Sept. 15-17: “Romeo and Juliet”

Oct. 21-29: “Not Afraid of the Dark” (Studio Theater)

Dec. 8-23: “The Nutcraker”

Feb. 16-18, 2018: “Masters of the Dance”

April 6-8, 2018: “Exit Wounds”

May 11-13, 2018: “Peter Pan”

Blanton Museum of Art

200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., blantonmuseum.org

Through Oct. 1: “Epic Tales from Ancient India”

Through Oct. 1: “Teresa Hubbard/Alexander Birchler: Giant”

Nov. 25-Jan. 7, 2018: “The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip”

Spring 2018: “Ellsworth Kelly’s Austin”

Big Medium

916 Springdale Road, 512-939-6665, bigmedium.org

Sept. 23-Dec. 2: Texas Biennial

Oct. 27-Nov. 19: Tito’s Prize Exhibit

Nov. 11-19: East Austin Studio Tour

Briscoe Center for American History

2300 Red River St., 512-495-4515

Through Sept. 17: “Exploring the American South”

Nov. 11, 2017-May 31, 2018: “Civil Rights Photography”

Broadway in Austin lands ‘A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder.’ Contributed

Broadway in Austin

Bass Concert Hall, 800-731-7469, BroadwayInAustin.com

Oct. 13-15: “Rent” (season option)

Dec. 12-17: “The King and I”

Jan. 16-21, 2018: “Finding Neverland”

Feb. 13-18, 2018: “School of Rock”

March 20-25, 2018: “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder”

April 17-22, 2018: “The Book of Mormon” (season option)

May 30-June 3, 2018: “An American in Paris”

Bullock Texas State History Museum

1800 Congress Ave., 512-936-8746, thestoryoftexas.com

Through Feb. 4, 2018: “The Nau Civil War Collection”

Through March 18, 2018: Pong to Pokémon: The Evolution of Electronic”

Sept. 2, 2017-Jan. 7, 2018: “American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition”

Feb. 17, 2018-Jan. 15, 2019: “Texas Rodeo”

Chorus Austin

Various locations, 512-719-3300, chorusaustin.org

Nov. 4-5: “Art of the Prophets”

Dec. 2: “On a Winter’s Eve”

Dec. 16: “Sing-It-Yourself Messiah”

City Theatre

3823 Airport Blvd., 512-524-2870, citytheatreaustin.orgtk

July 21-Aug. 13 “August: Osage County”

Aug. 18-Sept 10: “Chicago”

Co-Lab Projects’ Demo Gallery

721 Congress Ave., co-labprojects.org

Through July 23: “Unrealpolitick”

Aug. 5-26: “Expedition Batikback”

September: Claude van Lingen Retrospective

October: “Good Mourning Tis of Thee”

The Contemporary Austin – Jones Center

700 Congress Ave., 512-453-5312, thecontemporaryaustin.org

Sept. 23, 2017 – Jan. 14, 2018: “Wangechi Mutu”

Sept. 23, 2017 – Jan. 14, 2018: John Bock: “Dead + Juicy”

The Contemporary Austin – Laguna Gloria

3809 W. 35th At., 512-458-8191, thecontemporaryaustin.org

Sept. 23 – Ongoing: Ryan Gander: “The day to day accumulation of hope, failure and ecstasy”

Nov. 18 – Ongoing: “Carol Bove”

Conspirare

Various locations.

Oct. 10: Symphonic Choir Sings

Dec. 2-1: Conspirare Youth Choirs: Breath of Heaven

Dec. 9-14: Conspirare Christmas with Carrie Rodriguez

June 28-29, 2018: Bernstein Mass

Gilbert & Sullivan Austin

Various locations. gilbertsullivan.org.

Sept. 10: “The Daughter of the D’Oyly Carte”

Oct. 29: “Fall Gilbert & Sullivan Musicale”

Jan. 7: “Gilbert & Sullivan Revue and Sing-Along”

March 4-5: “Trail by Jury”

June 14-24: “Rudigore”

Georgetown Palace Theatre

810 S. Austin Ave., 512-869-7469, georgetownpalace.com

Sept. 1-Oct. 1: “You Can’t Do That Dan Moody” (Courthouse)

Sept. 29-Oct. 22: “Drinking Habits”

Oct. 20-Nov. 26: “Annie”

Oct. 27-Nov. 5: “Tony Harrison: Ballads & Bobbie Socks”

Nov. 17-Dec. 30: “Santaland Diaries”

Dec. 8-30: “A Christmas Carol”

Jan. 19-28, 2018: “Buddy Patsy”

Feb. 16-March 11, 2018: “Barefoot in the Park”

Feb. 23-March 25, 2018: “Mame”

March 30-April 22, 2018: “Dearly Departed”

April 20-May 20, 2018: “My Fair Lady”

June 1-24, 2018: “25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”

July 13-Aug. 12, 2018: “Mary Poppins”

Aug. 31-Sept. 30, 2018: “Million Dollar Quartet”

Hyde Park Theatre

511 W. 43rd St., 512-479-7529, hydeparktheatre.org

Through Aug. 5: “The Moors”

Sept. 21-Oct. 21: “The Wolves”

Jan. 16-Feb. 17. 2018: FronteraFest

March 1-31, 2018: “Wakey Wakey”

jwj-graham-reynolds-0026b
Graham Reynolds lands at the Long Center. Contributed

Long Center for the Performing Arts

Aug. 11-13: “Fun Home”

Aug. 23: “An Evening with the Piano Guys”

Aug. 30: “An Evening with Carrie Rodriguez”

Sept. 13-14: Manual Cinema: “Lula Del Rey”

Sept. 16: “Kaki King: The Neck is a Bridge to the Body”

Sept. 30: Terrence Malick’s: “The Tree of Life”

Oct. 11-12: “Star Wars: A New Hope”

Oct. 21: “Shopkins Live!”

Oct. 25: “The Jeff Lofton Thang”

Nov. 13: Photographer Annie Liebovitz

Nov. 18: “An Evening with Maureen Dowd and Carl Hulse in Conversation”

Nov. 24: “Santa on the Terrace”

NOv. 24-25: “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Raindeer: The Musical”

Dec. 20: “Graham Reynolds Ruins the Holidays”

Dec. 29: “A Christmas Story: The Musical”

LBJ Presidential Library

2313 Red River St., lbjlibrary.org

Through Sept 6: “Deep in the Vaults of Texas”

Through Nov. 12: “On the Air: 50 Years of Public Broadcasting”

Oct. 28, 2017-Jan. 21, 2018: “Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection”

April 21, 2018-Jan. 13, 2019: “Get in the Game: Gender, Race and Sports in America”

Mary Moody Northen Theatre

St. Edward’s University campus, 512-448-8484, stedwards.edu/theatre

Sept. 28-Oct. 8: “Rhinoceros”

Nov. 9-19: “Anon(ymous)”

Feb. 15-25,2018: “Romeo and Juliet”

April 12-22, 2018: “Violet”

Mexic-Arte Museum

419 Congress Ave., 512-480-9373, mexic-artemuseum.org

Sept. 16–Nov. 26: “Diego y Frida: A Smile in the Middle of the Way”

Sept. 16–Nov. 26: “Community Altars”

October 2017–September 2018: “Changarrito Project”

 Oct. 17-September 2018: #ElMeroMuro”

Oct. 22: “The Catrina Ball: Viva Frida”

Dec. 9, 2017–Jan. 7, 2018: “Mix ‘n’ Mash 2017”

Dec. 9, 2017–Jan. 7, 2018: “Nacimientos y Retablos”

Jan. 26–March 1, 2018 and March 31–May 27, 2018: “Fotografia y Nuevos Medios from the Permanent Collection”

Jan 26–Feb. 14, 2018 and March 31–May 27, 2018: “Desert Triangle Print Portfolio”

June 15–Aug. 26, 2018: “YLA 23: Beyond Walls, Between Gates, Under Bridges”

June 15–Aug. 26, 2018: “Museum Studies Exhibition Library”

One World Theatre

7701 Bee Caves Road, 512-330-9500.

Aug. 10: Livingston Taylor

Aug. 11: Pieces of a Dream

Aug. 12: Edwin McCain

Aug. 20: Pure Prairie League

Sept. 2: Hillbenders – The Who’sTommy: A Bluegrass Opry

Sept. 3: The Everly Brothers Experience featuring the Zmed Bros

Sept. 8: Spyro Gyra

Sept. 9: David Cook

Sept. 10: Dailey & Vincent

Oct. 19: Joan Osborne

Oct. 22: Ricky Skaggs

Oct. 26: Jimmy Webb

Oct. 27: Lisa Fischer

Oct.  29: Jonathan Butler

Nov. 3: Guess Who

Nov. 9: Stanley Jordan

Nov. 12: Herman’s Hermits

Nov. 17: Ottmar Liebert

Nov. 19: Eddie Palmieri

Nov. 26: Riders In The Sky

Nov. 30: Kim Waters

Dec. 3: Petula Clark

Dec. 8: Norman Brown’s Joyous Christmas with Bobby Caldwell & Marion Meadows

Dec. 13: Annie Moses Band

Dec. 15: Tidings of Jazz & Joy with Keiko Matsui, Euge Groove featuring Lindsey Webster & Adam Hawley

Jan. 2018: Pete The Cat

Jan. 26, 2018: The Lettermen

Feb. 7-8, 2018: George Winston

Feb. 25, 2018: BJ Thomas

March 3, 2018: Judy Collins

March 10, 2018: Nugget & Gang

March 25, 2018: Take Six

March 30, 2018: 1964 The Tribute

April 29, 2018: Music of Abba

Gladys Knight.jpg
Gladys Knight. Contributed

Paramount and Stateside

713 Congress Ave., austintheatre.org

Sept. 22: The Flatlanders with Dan Penn

Sept. 23: Roger McGuinn

Sept. 28: Radney Foster

Sept.r 30: AJ Croce

Oct. 4: Lila Downs

Oct. 20: Del McCoury Band

Oct. 21: Selected Shorts

Oct. 21: Hal Ketchum

Nov. 8: An Evening of Storytelling with Garrison Keillor

Nov. 9: Demetri Martin presented by Moontower Comedy

Nov. 12: Jack Hanna’s Into The Wild Live

Nov. 17: Ray Wylie Hubbard’s Birthday Bash

Nov. 18: John Hodgman: Vacationland

Nov. 19: Gladys Knight

Dec. 1: A John Waters Christmas

Dec. 12: Tommy Emmanuel

Dec. 14: The Moth

Dec. 16: Bruce Robison & Kelly WillisTheatre

Jan. 31: Captain Scott Kelly

Penfold Theatre Company
Various locations, 512-850-4849, penfoldtheatre.org
Oct. 13-30: “Woman in Black”
Nov. 30-Dec. 23: “A Miracle on 34th Street Classic Radiocast”
Apr. 29, 2018: “A Marvelous Party”
May 31-Jun. 23, 2018: “Much Ado About Nothing”

Pollyana Theatre

Long Center, pollyanna.org

Sept. 30-Oct. 8: “A Moon of My Own’

Nov. 9-Dec. 18: “Chicken Story Time”

Jan. 18-Jan. 27, 2018: “Dog’s Job”

Feb. 14-Feb. 17, 2018: “Liberty, Equality and Fireworks!”

March 22-May 20, 2018: “Hurry Up and Wait”

May 12-May 20, 2018: “The Secret of Soap and Spin”

June 23-July 1, 2018: “If Wishes were Fishes”

July 12-July 21, 2018: “All Aboard!”

Ransom Center

300 We. 21st St., 512-471-8944, hrc.utexas.edu

Sept. 11, 2017-Jan. 1, 2018: “Mexico Modern: Art, Commerce and Cultural Exchange, 1920-1945”

Jan. 29-July 15, 2018: “Vaudeville”

Rude Mechs

Various locations, rudemechs.com

Aug. 27: “Gragelart”

Sept. 24: Stand-up Comedy Workshop

Oct. 21: “The Eye Ball”

November: “Gin & Tonix”

December: “Christmas Karaoke”

January, 2018: “Salon in a Salon”

February, 2018:  Off Center On Screen

March, 2018: “Fixing Troilus & Cressida”

April, 2018: “Perverse Results”

May, 2018: “Gragerlart”

Salvage Vanguard Theater

Various locations, salvagevanguard.org.

Oct. 26-Nov. 11: “Blu”

March 15-31, 2018: “Con Flama”

Tapestry Dance

Long Center, 512-474-9846, thelongcenter.org

Oct. 12-22: “Just Tap!”

Dec. 7-17: “Of Mice & Music: A Tap Jazz Nutcracker”

April 26-May 6, 2018: “April Fools”

June 14-16, 2018: “Soul 2 Sole Fest”

Texas Performing Arts presents the Philip Glass Ensemble playing with ‘Koyannisqatsi.’ Contributed

Texas Performing Arts

Various locations on UT Campus, 512-477-6060, texasperformingarts.org

Sept. 18: Dover Quartet

Sept. 21: Storm Large & Le Bonheur

Sept. 24: Spanish Brass

Sept. 29: Abraham.In.Motion

Oct. 5: Sergei Babayan

Nov. 8: Fifth House Ensemble’s Journey Live

Nov. 16: Seth Rudetsky’s Deconstructing Broadway

Nov. 18: Monty Alexander Harlem-Kingston Express

Dec. 1-2: Kurt Elling with the Swingles

Jan. 20, 2018: Chanticleer

Jan. 25-26, 2018: “Sancho: An Act of Remembrance”

Feb. 1, 2018: Ezralow Dance

Feb. 2, 2018: Ute Lemper

Feb. 16, 2018: Sergio & Odair Assad and Avi Avital

Feb. 23, 2018: Philip Glass Ensemble’s Koyaanisqatsi

March 8, 2018: “Musical Thrones: A Parody”

March 27, 2018: Che Malambo

April 3, 2018: University of Texas Symphony Orchestra

April 11, 2018: Hubbard Street Dance Chicago

April 14, 2018: University of Texas Jazz Orchestra with Conrad Herwig

Texas State University Theatre and Dance

Various locations on the Texas State campus. theatreanddance.txstate.edu

Sept. 26-Oct. 1: “A Chorus Line”

Oct. 12-15: “A Doll’s House”

Oct. 31-Nov. 5: “Perfect Pie”

Nov. 9-12: “We Are Proud to Present …”

Nov. 14-19: “Hamlet”

Feb. 1-4, 2018: “Speech and Debate”

Feb. 13-18, 2018: “The Rivals”

Feb. 22-25, 2018: “Instructions for Dancing”

April 10-15, 2018: “A Wrinkle in Time”

April 17-22: “Ragtime”

Umlauf Sculpture Garden and Museum

605 Robert E. Lee Road, 512-445-5582, umlaufsculpture.org

Aug. 8: “Umlauf After Dark”

Sept 5-Nov. 26: “Umlauf Prize Exhibition featuring Bucky Miller”

Oct. 29: “Last Straw Fest”

Nov. 12: Classical Garden

Feb. 14, 2018: Classical Garden

April 26, 201: Umlauf Garden Party

UT Butler School of Music (highlights)

Various locations on the UT campus. 512-477-6060, texasperformingarts.org

Sept. 7: Miró Quartet

Sept. 22: Thee Phantom & The Illharmonic Orchestra

Oct. 8: Anton Nel on the Fortepiano

Oct 27-Nov. 5: “Cosi Fan Tutte”

Nov. 16: Miró Quartet

Dec. 9: Holiday Choral Concert

Jan. 26, 2018: Miró Quartet

March 3, 2018: UT Symphony Orchestra

March 20-29, 2018: “Falstaff”

UT Theatre & Dance

Various locations on UT campus, 512-477-6060, texasperformingarts.org

Aug. 30-Sept 10: “Building the Wall”

Oct. 4-15: “Anon(ymous)”

Nov. 7-12: “Fall for Dance”

Nov. 8-19: “The Crucible”

Dec. 6-10: “The Drowsy Chaperone”

Feb. 21-March 4, 2018: “Enron”

March 28-April 8, 2018: “Transcendence”

April 12-22, 2018: “UT New Theatre”

UT Visual Arts Center

2300 Trinity St., 512-232-2348, utvac.org

Sept. 22-Dec. 9: Larry Bamburg

Sept: 22-Dec. 9: “Artists’ Books in Mexico”

Sept. 22-Oct. 20: Marta Lee and Anika Steepe

Sept. 22-Oct. 20: “New Barbizon Collective”

Sept. 22-Oct. 6: Fieldwork: “Mille Otto”

Rob Nash returns with ‘Holy Cross Sucks.’ Contributed by OUTmedia

The Vortex

2307 Manor Road, 512-478-5282, vortexrep.org

Sept. 8-24: “Storm Still”

Sept. 8-9: “Linda Mary Montano’s Birth/Death”

Sept. 22-Oct. 21: “Vampyress”

Oct. 4: “Icons: The Lesbian and Gay History of the World, Vol 1”

Nov. 2-5: “P3M5 Plays”

Nov. 9-11: “Somewhere Between”

Nov. 16-Dec. 9: “Wild Horses”

Nov. 17-Dec. 9: “The Member of the Wedding”

Dec. 14-17: “Rob Nash’s Holy Cross Sucks”

Dec. 21-Jan. 7, 2018: “The Muttcracker (Sweet!)”

Jan. 11-20, 2018: “The Way She Spoke”

Jan. 26-Feb. 10, 2018: “893/Ya-ku-za”

Feb. 14-18, 2018: Outsider Fest

Feb 22-25, 2018: “Reveal All Feature Nothing”

March 2, 2018: Cinema Dada

March 3, 2018: Congo Square

March 23-May 12, 2018: Performance Park

May 17-19, 2018: Toni Bravo’s “Home”

May 25-June 9, 2018: “Polly Mermaid”

June 15-30, 2018: “The Claire Play”

July 6-21, 2018: “The Last Witch”

July 27-Aug. 4, 2018: Summer Youth Theatre

Zach Theatre

202 S. Lamar Blvd., 512-476-0541

Through Sept. 3: “Million Dollar Quartet”

Sept. 27-Oct. 29: “Singin’ in the Rain”

Nov. 1-Dec. 31: “A Tuna Christmas”

Nov. 22-Dec. 31: “A Christmas Carol”

May 30-June 24, 2018: “Sunday in the Park with George”

June 20-July 22, 2018: “Heisenberg”

July 11-Sept. 2, 2018: “Beauty and the Beast”

 

 

Time to plan your fall season at the Long Center

A picture of Austin’s fall arts season is falling into place. The latest booking news is from the Long Center for the Performing Aarts. We rearranged, condensed and edited for style their fine descriptions of the following.

Notice that the fall season begins in July. Why not? We only wish the weather would comply.

Also, there’s a lot of other offerings, including Summer Stock Austin, at the center that aren’t part of this season package, so stay alert.

A character from Legend of Zelda. Contributed

“The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses
”


Dell Hall, July 7

Coinciding with the newly released “The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild” and Nintendo’s new Switch, this returns to the Long Center stage on July 7 for one performance only. Now in its fourth season and featuring new music and video, the concert comes to life with a 66-piece orchestra, 24-person choir.

“Fun Home”

Dell Hall, Aug. 11-13

The winner of five 2015 Tony Awards including Best Musical, Best Score, Best Book and Best Direction, this unusual show is based on Alison Bechdel’s 2006 best-selling graphic memoir.

“An Evening with The Piano Guys

Dell Hall, Aug. 23

The Piano Guys have become an internet sensation by way of their immensely successful series of self-made music videos, leading to over 500 million YouTube views.

Carrie Rodriguez. Jay Janner/American-Statesman

“An Evening with Carrie Rodriguez
”

Rollins Studio Theatre, Aug. 30

Austin native Carrie Rodriguez is a fiddle playing singer songwriter who approaches her country-blues sound with an “Ameri-Chicana” attitude.  Her latest release, “Lola,” takes her back to her ranchera musical roots and was hailed as the “perfect bicultural album” by NPR’s Felix Contreras.

Manual Cinema: “Lula Del Ray”

Rollins Studio Theatre,  Sept. 13-14          

This troupe of theatrical artists are not just puppeteers, but creators of otherworldly landscapes through a striking combination of live actors, old-school projectors and silhouette magic.

“Kaki King: The Neck is a Bridge to the Body 
”

Rollins Studio Theatre, Sept. 16

Hailed by Rolling Stone Magazine as “a genre unto herself,” composer, guitarist, and recording artist Kaki King performs her latest work — a simultaneous homage and deep exploration of her instrument of choice. In this bold new multi-media performance, Kaki deconstructs the guitar’s boundaries as projection mapping explores texture, nature, and creation.

Terrence Malick’s “The Tree of Life”

Dell Hall, Sept. 30

Part coming-of-age story and part divine commentary, Terrence Malick’s star-studded and slow-burning art film, “The Tree of Life,” sparked a dialogue within the industry about memory, the meaning of life, and the role that film can play in representing those ideas. Screening with live score performed by Austin Symphony Orchestra and Chorus Austin.

“Star Wars: A New Hope”

Dell Hall, Oct. 11–12

John William’s legendary “Star Wars” score didn’t just enhance a great story, it gave life to an entire galaxy. From “Binary Sunset” to the “Imperial March,” the themes of “A New Hope” ushered in a renaissance of film music, the likes of which Hollywood had never seen before. A special screening with live score performed by the Austin Symphony Orchestra.

“Shopkins Live!”

Dell Hall, Oct. 21

This lights up the stage in this premiere live production packed with show-stopping performances featuring the Shoppies and Shopkins characters taking the stage with an all-new storyline, music, and videos. Join Jessicake, Bubbleisha, Peppa-Mint, Rainbow Kate, Cocolette, and Polli Polish as they perform the coolest dance moves, sing the latest pop songs, and prepare for Shopville’s annual “Funtastic Food and Fashion Fair.”

Jeff Lofton. Contributed by Claire Newman.

“The Jeff Lofton Electric Thang
”

Rollins Studio Theatre, Oct. 25

Jazz artist Jeff Lofton – together with his groups The Jeff Lofton Trio and his Electric Thang – has quickly become a household name around Austin’s low-key bars and jazz lounges.

An evening with Maureen Dowd and Carl Hulse In Conversation

Dell Hall, Saturday Nov. 18

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Op-Ed columnist for the New York Times, Maureen Dowd, and award-winning author and the Times’ Chief Washington Correspondent, Carl Hulse, will examine the state of the nation one year following the most divisive presidential election in American history. Join us for an evening of incisive dialogue as Dowd and Hulse discuss how we got here and what lies ahead.

“Santa on the Terrace”

City Terrace, Nov. 24 

Bring the family and join us on the City Terrace and take some time out of the busiest holiday of the year to celebrate the season. Bring the kids for a free photo with Santa and enjoy holiday treats, activities and entertainment, all overlooking the best view in Austin!

“Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical”

Dell Hall, Nov. 24-25

The favorite TV classic soars off the screen and onto the stage in this beloved adaptation. Come see all of your favorite characters from the special including Santa and Mrs. Claus, Hermey the Elf, the Abominable Snow Monster, Clarice, Yukon Cornelius, and of course, Rudolph brought to life.

Graham Reynolds. Jay Janner/American-Statesman

“Graham Reynolds Ruins the Holidays”

Rollins Studio Theatre, Dec. 20

Composer and bandleader, Graham Reynolds, along with some of Austin’s best musicians wreak musical havoc with an explosive set of holiday favorites. By playing most of them in a minor key, Reynolds and his band bring a new perspective to these season standards.

“A Christmas Story: The Musical”

Dell Hall, Dec. 29–31

After a smash-hit Broadway run garnering three Tony-Award nominations including Best Musical, this Christmas classic returns for another year. Based on the perennial holiday movie favorite, the story takes place in 1940s Indiana, where a bespectacled boy named Ralphie wants only one thing for Christmas: an official Red Ryder Carbine-Action 200-shot range Model Air Rifle.

 

Arts ringleader Paul Beutel to retire from the Long Center

After more than four decades as an arts leader wearing countless hats, Paul Beutel has announced that he will retire from the Long Center for the Performing Arts on June 30.

A respected actor and singer, Beutel also reviewed movies and theater for the American-Statesman, worked as marketing director for what is now Texas Performing Arts, served as director, producer and presenter at the Paramount Theatre for almost two decades, ran Miller Outdoor Theatre in Houston, and wound up his career as senior programming manager at the Long Center.

Head shot
Longtime arts leader Paul Beutel to retire. Contributed

“It’s hard for me to believe that I have been working in this wonderful and crazy business for 42 years, the last eight-plus years at the Long Center,” says Beutel. “It’s even harder for me to believe that at the end of the month, I will celebrate my 67th birthday. Thus, it seems like a good time to bring the curtain down on this phase of my life and retire.”

I first spotted Beutel onstage in “Carnival” at TUTS in Houston in the early 1970s. He was already a fixture in the Austin arts scene when I arrived in 1984. He was especially good at booking shows with undeniable entertainment value and populist appeal. Beutel also played a major role in the long tenure of the “Greater Tuna” plays, for instance, and Austin Musical Theatre at the Paramount. He also nurtured the theater’s still popular summer classic movie series.

RELATED: Jaston Williams cooks up another bit of ‘Greater Tuna.’ Jaston Williams cooks up another bit of ‘Greater Tuna.’

Helming the Paramount through stormy financial waters, Beutel was always known as a passionate advocate but also a straight shooter who didn’t dodge hard questions from the press.

He has held several positions at the Long Center, including interim executive director from 2010 to 2011. He was also instrumental in amplifying the center’s educational programs through events such as the Greater Austin High School Musical Theatre Awards.

RELATED: All rise for Austin high school musicals!

“I can’t thank Paul enough for his years of service to both the Long Center and the greater performing arts field,” says the center’s director and CEO Cory Baker. “He is truly a legend and I will always be grateful for the opportunity to work alongside him in Austin. The Long Center would not be the organization it is today without his dedication, passion and remarkable instinct. We expect to still see Paul around often as he will always be a member of our family.”

Beutel’s retirement plans include “catching up on approximately 125 DVDs and having a cocktail or two with the many friends I’ve made in this business over the years.”

UPDATED: In Houston, Beutel operated Miller Outdoor Theatre.

I want to see virtually every show in Texas Performing Arts’ next season

Nine years ago, I told Kathy Panoff, then incoming director of Texas Performing Arts, that she was a “firecracker.” Well, she’s still lighting up the sky.

Tonight on the Bass Concert Hall stage at the University of Texas, she sent up blazing bottle rockets for her group’s 2017-2018 season, and I want to see virtually ever show on the bill.

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Start off, as almost everybody does, with its Broadway in Austin partnership. I’ll sign up right now for “Rent,” “The King and I,” “Finding Neverland,” “School of Rock,” “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder,” “The Book of Mormon” and “An American in Paris.”

Yes, even “Rent,” which I’ve grown to love over the past 20 years, mostly because of a Texas State University version with — thank you! — age-appropriate actors. Hello!

And guess what? If you don’t sign up for the 2017-2018 season, forget getting tickets to “Hamilton” the next season. The Broadway series already has added 3,000 new subscribers in anticipation.

RELATED: Broadway smash “Hamilton” coming to Austin in 2018-2019 season.

At the top of my list from the non-Broadway season are three cabaret shows: Storm Large & Le Bonheur, Ute Lemper’s “Last Tango in Berlin” and Seth Rudetsky‘s “Deconstructing Broadway.” It’s like Broadway, too, but refined to the nth degree.

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I was also very much attracted to the dance groups: Che Malambo (“Machismo in a jar”), Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Ezralow Dance’s “Open” and Abraham.In.Motion‘s “Live! The Realest MC.” Two I’ve seen before, the other two sizzled in projected videos.

Of the musical selections, I am jazzed to see the Philip Glass Ensemble play “Koyaanisqatsi” live — my first Glass back in 1982 — and Chanticleer doing “Soldier.”

Playing to my jazz affections are Kurt Elling with the SwinglesMonty Alexander Harlem-Kinston Express. 

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Also on the bill are Spanish BrassDover Quartet, Sergei Babayan, Sergio & Odair, guitars and Avi Avital, mandolin, the University of Texas Symphony Orchestra and University of Texas Jazz Orchestra with Conrad Herwig — along some hybrid shows, such as Fifth House Ensemble performing music from the game “Journey” live as it is played and “Musical Thrones: A Parody.”

Straight theater has not been forgotten: “The Crucible” and “Sancho: An Act of Remembrance.”

How am I going to see all this? I’ll worry about that tomorrow.