Austin theater alum Tyler Mount wins Tony Award

Tyler Mount, who studied at St. Edward’s University and developed a popular vlog for Playbill.com, took home a Tony Award on Sunday. Mount recently returned to town to emcee the Greater Austin High School Musical Theatre Awards.

RELATED: Tyler Mount returns to Austin for musical theater awards.

Although it was hard to pick him out in the acceptance crowd onstage, Mount’s honor came as a named producer for “Once on This Island,” which won Best Revival of a Musical. Austinites Marc and Carolyn Seriff also invested as producers in two winning shows this Broadway season, but their names did not appear above the title, so they were ineligible. They actually were named producers last season for “Anastasia,” which comes through town via the Broadway in Austin series at Bass Concert Hall next season.

RELATED: Broadway smash “Hamilton” in Austin 2018-2019 season.

Mount made a fantastic emcee for Austin’s closest entertainment equivalent to the Tony Awards. He even joked about his possible Tony status during the ceremony. And while we are on the subject, this year’s Tonys were, with one jarring exception, tone perfect. The students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, who sang “Seasons of Love” from “Rent,” had me weeping from the first first piano chords.

RELATED: Winning the Austin High School Musical Awards.

Winners rejoice for 2018 Austin Critics Table Awards

Seems like yesterday when we sat down at Katz’s Deli to vote on the first Austin Critics Table Awards. Now a whole new generation of arts journalists are making the decisions. We could not be happier.

The following individuals and groups were honored Monday night at Cap City Comedy Club. (If I missed any, let me know.)

CRITICS TABLE AWARDS 2018

THEATER

Production (tie)

“Henry IV,” The Hidden Room Theatre

“Ragtime,” Texas State University Department of Theatre and Dance

RELATED: “Ragtime” is an American classic.

Direction

Jason Phelps, “The Brothers Size”

David Mark Cohen New Play Award

“Wild Horses,” Allison Gregory

Performance by an Individual

John Christopher, “The Brothers Size”/”Fixing Troilus and Cressida”

Chanel, “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill”

Jennifer Coy Jennings, “Wild Horses”

Sarah Danko, “The Effect”/”Grounded”

Judd Farris, “Henry IV”/”The Repentance of Saint Joan”

Joseph Garlock, “The Immigrant”

Performance by an Ensemble

“The Wolves,” Hyde Park Theatre

Periphery Company

“Wimberley Players,” Wimberley

Improvised Production
“Orphans!,” The Hideout Theatre
“Speak No More,” Golden

DESIGN

Set (tie)

Stephanie Busing, “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”

Chris Conard/Zac Thomas, “Pocatello”

Costume

Buffy Manners, “Shakespeare in Love”

Lighting

Rachel Atkinson, “Scheherazade”/”Twenty-Eight”/”Catalina de Erauso”/”The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”/”Con Flama”

Sound

Lowell Bartholomee, “Grounded”

Digital (tie)

Lowell Bartholomee, “The Effect/Wakey Wakey”/”The Repentance of Saint Joan”/”Grounded”

Robert Mallin, “Enron”

DANCE

Concert

(“Re)current Unrest”, Charles O. Anderson/Fusebox Festival

Short Work

“Four Mortal Men,” Ballet Austin

Choreographer

Jennifer Hart, “Fellow Travelers”/“Murmuration”

Dancer

Anika Jones, “Belonging, Part One”

Rosalyn Nasky, “Come In!!!”/”Pod”/”There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe”

Jun Shen, “Belonging, Part One”

Ensemble

“Exit Wounds”/”Masters of Dance,” Ballet Austin

RELATED: Ballet Austin aims for the heart with “Exit Wounds.”

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Concert/Opera

“Southwest Voices,” Chorus Austin

Chamber Performance

Golden Hornet Young Composers Concert, Golden Hornet

Original Composition/Score

“I/We,” Joseph V. Williams II

Singer

Marina Costa-Jackson, “La Traviata”

Jenifer Thyssen, “An Early Christmas”/”It’s About Time: Companions”/”Complaints Through the Ages”

Veronica Williams, “Songs of Remembrance and Resistance”

Ensemble

“Invoke, Beerthoven”/Golden Hornet Smackdown IV

Instrumentalist (tie)

Bruce Colson, “It’s About Time: Companions”

Artina McCain, “Black Composers Concert: The Black Female Composer”

VISUAL ART

Solo Gallery Exhibition

“Claude van Lingen: Timekeeper,” Co-Lab Projects

Group Gallery Exhibition

“Yo soy aqui / I am here,” ICOSA

Museum Exhibition

“The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip,” Blanton Museum of Art

Independent Project

2017 Texas Biennial

Gallery, Body of Work

Co-Lab Projects

Artist

Michael Anthony Garcia

SPECIAL CITATIONS

John Bustin Award for Conspicuous Versaility: Mary Agen Cox, Jeff Mills

Deacon Crain Award for Outstanding Student Work: Connor Barr, Kat Lozano, UT; Ben Toomer, Texas State

Outstanding Music Direction: Austin Haller for “Ragtime”

Outstanding Choreography: Natasha Davison for “The Drowsy Chaperone”

Horn of Plenty Award: Benjamin Taylor Ridgeway & Jennifer Rose Davis for the masks in “Rhinoceros”

Jurassic Spark Award: The Hatchery for creating the raptors in “Enron”

One Singular Sensation Award: Kaitlin Hopkins for the Texas State University Musical Theatre Program

RELATED: Kaitlin Hopkins takes Texas State to the top.

Always a Safe Flight Award: Barry Wilson & Team for Rigging Design & Execution in “Belonging, Part One”

Outstanding Touring Show, Dance: Johnny Cruise Mercer and Fusebox Festival for “Plunge In/To 534”

Architecture is Art Award: Blanton Museum of Art for Ellsworth Kelly’s “Austin”

Mount Everest Award: Vortex Repertory Theatre for “Performance Park”

Flip the Table Award: David Wyatt and John Riedie for meritorious service to the Austin Critics Table

AUSTIN ARTS HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Norman Blumensaadt (Different Stages) – company founder, artistic director, director, actor

Kathy Dunn Hamrick (Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company, Cafe Dance) – company founder, artistic director, choreographer, dancer, educator

Michael and Jeanne Klein (Blanton Museum of Art, The Contemporary Austin, Ransom Center, et al.) – patrons, board members, civic leaders, arts advocates

Anuradha Naimpally (Austin Dance India, Cafe Dance) – company founder, artistic director, dancer, choreographer, educator

Critics name finalists for 2018 Austin arts awards

It’s time. The Austin Critics Table Awards nominations came out this morning.

Buzz Moran at the Critics Table Awards at Cap City Comedy Club in 2008. That’s a decade ago! Michael Barnes/AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

The gathered minds invented new categories, both under the heading of Theater: Periphery Company, recognizing the theatrical body of work by companies outside of Austin proper, and Improvised Production, recognizing mainstage projects by area improv troupes.

That puts the number of official categories this year at 29 (7 theater, 5 design, 5 dance, 6 classical music, 6 visual arts). Critics also promise at least 11 special citations.

RELATED: 2018 Austin Arts Hall of Fame honorees.

The ceremony is 7 p.m. June 4 at Cap City Comedy Club, 8120 Research. Admission is free. The public is welcome.

Logo for Austin Critics Table Award. By Michael Crampton for American-Statesman

AUSTIN CRITICS TABLE NOMINATIONS 2018

THEATER

Production

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, ZACH Theatre

Enron, UT Austin Department of Theatre & Dance

Henry IV, The Hidden Room Theatre

Pocatello, Street Corner Arts

Ragtime, Texas State University Department of Theatre and Dance

The Repentance of Saint Joan, Paper Chairs

The Wolves, Hyde Park Theatre

Direction

Jason Phelps, The Brothers Size

Rudy Ramirez, The Revolutionists/Storm Still/Wild Horses/The Way She Spoke: A Docu-Mythologia

kt shorb, Scheherazade

Dave Steakley, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Benjamin Summers, Pocatello

Dustin Wills, Catalina de Erauso

Hannah Wolf, Enron

David Mark Cohen New Play Award

Catalina de Erauso, Elizabeth Doss

Fixing Troilus and Cressida, Kirk Lynn

The Repentance of Saint Joan, Patrick Shaw

Scheherazade, Scheherazade ensemble

The Secretary, Kyle John Schmidt

A Shoe Story, Allen Robertson & Damon Brown

Wild Horses, Allison Gregory

Performance by an Individual

John Christopher, The Brothers Size/Fixing Troilus and Cressida

Crystal Bird Caviel, The Moors/Fixing Troilus and Cressida

Chanel, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill

Jennifer Coy Jennings, Wild Horses

Sarah Danko, The Effect/Grounded

Sam Domino, Prodigal Son

Judd Farris, Henry IV/The Repentance of Saint Joan

Joseph Garlock, The Immigrant

Bill Karnovsky, Yankee Tavern

Katie Kohler, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Robert Matney, Henry IV

Amber Quick, Pocatello/The Secretary

Performance by an Ensemble

A Chorus Line, Texas State University Department of Theatre and Dance

Catalina de Erauso, Paper Chairs

Enron, UT Austin Department of Theatre & Dance

Pocatello, Street Corner Arts

The Seafarer, City Theatre

Vampyress, Vortex Repertory Company

The Wolves, Hyde Park Theatre

Periphery Company

Gaslight Baker Theatre, Lockhart

Georgetown Palace Theatre, Georgetown

Fredericksburg Theater Company, Fredericksburg

Way Off Broadway Community Players, Leander

Wimberley Players, Wimberley

Improvised Production

The 48-Hour Improv Marathon: Hour 48, The Hideout Theatre

Broad Ambition, Girls Girls Girls

Deja Noir, ColdTowne Theater

The Kindness of Strangers, The Hideout Theatre

Latinauts: The Wrath of Juan, Prima Doñas

Orphans!, The Hideout Theatre

Speak No More, Golden

2018 Critics Table Awards June 4 jpg

DESIGN

Set

Stephanie Busing, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Chris Conard/Zac Thomas, Pocatello

Magdalena Jarkowiec, “In Here”

Lisa Laratta, Catalina de Erauso/The Repentance of Saint Joan

Roxy Mojica, Enron

Desiderio Roybal, The Father

Lino Toyos, The Drowsy Chaperone

Costume

Emily Cawood, “Fellow Travelers”/“Klein Blue (The Void)”

Jennifer Rose Davis, The Revolutionists

Cait Graham, Enron

E.L. Hohn, Catalina de Erauso

Buffy Manners, Shakespeare in Love

Cheryl Painter, The Moors

Barbara Pope, The Drowsy Chaperone

Lighting

Rachel Atkinson, Scheherazade/Twentyeight/Catalina de Erauso/The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time/con flama

Natalie George, 11:11:10/11:11:11/A Study in Release/Romeo and Juliet/There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe

Sarah EC Maines, In the Heights

Steven Myers, “Fellow Travelers”/”Murmuration”/“Klein Blue/The Void”

Stephen Pruitt, Parade/Juana: First (I) Dream/Glacier/Diet Fizz Radio/Bartholomew Swims

Alex Soto/Ilios Lighting, Belonging, Part One

Tony Tucci, Exit Wounds

Sound

Lowell Bartholomee, Grounded

Robert S. Fisher, The Moors/Wakey Wakey

William Meadows, Belonging, Part One

Robert Pierson & Dustin Wills, Catalina de Erauso

Drew Silverman, “A Meditation”

Jesse Wilson, with Brandon Guerra, John Clark Gable, and KIVI, Diet Fizz Radio

Digital

Lowell Bartholomee, The Effect/Wakey Wakey/The Repentance of Saint Joan/Grounded

Ashton Bennett Murphy, “Mirror”

Eliot Gray Fisher, “In the Ether”

Robert Mallin, Enron

DANCE

Concert

A Study in Release, The Illusory Impressions Project

Fall for Dance, Dance Repertory Theatre

First (I) Dream, A’lante Flamenco

Masters of Dance, Ballet Austin

Midsummer Offerings, Performa/Dance

Parade, Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company

(Re)current Unrest, Charles O. Anderson/Fusebox Festival

Short Work

“Finale,” Jennifer Sherburn

“Four Mortal Men,” Ballet Austin

“In Here,” Magdalena Jarkowiec/Fusebox Festival

“In the Ether,” Dance Repertory Theatre

“Murmuration,” Ballet Austin II

“Overseas Phone Call, 1987,” Magdalena Jarkowiec/Performa/Dance

“When,” Dance Repertory Theatre

Choreographer

Charles O. Anderson, (Re)current Unrest

Kathy Dunn Hamrick, Parade/Glacier

Rennie Harris, “Resurrection”

Jennifer Hart, “Fellow Travelers”/“Murmuration”

Taryn Lavery & Alex Miller, with Hailley Laurèn, Amy Myers, and Lucy Wilson, Diet Fizz Radio

Ray Eliot Schwartz, “Otras Puertas/Otras Rumbos”

Jennifer Sherburn, “Lapse”/”Finale”

Dancer

Charles O. Anderson, “(Re)current Unrest pt. 3: Clapback”

Ellen Bartel, “Attic”

Alexa Capareda, “Diet Fizz Radio”/”Overseas Phone Call, 1987”/”In Here”

Anika Jones, Belonging, Part One

Anuradha Naimpally, “Krishna the Divine Lover”

Rosalyn Nasky, “Come In!!!”/”Pod”/There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe

Kelsey Oliver, “Overseas Phone Call, 1987”/”In Here”

Oren Porterfield, “Fellow Travelers”

Emily Rushing, “Flicker.Burn.Repeat”

Jun Shen, Belonging, Part One

Ensemble

Exit Wounds/Masters of Dance, Ballet Austin

“Fellow Travelers,” Performa/Dance

“Otras Puertas/Otras Rumbos,” Fall for Dance

Parade, Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company

(Re)current Unrest, Charles O. Anderson/Fusebox Festival

“Resurrection,” Dance Repertory Theatre

There’s No Such Thing as a Single Stripe, ensemble

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Concert/Opera

Bach: Mass in B Minor, Panoramic Voices

Carmen, Austin Opera

La Clemenza di Tito: A Retelling, LOLA

Feast of Voices, Austin Symphony Orchestra with Chorus Austin

Southwest Voices, Chorus Austin

La Traviata, Austin Opera

Unclouded Day, Conspirare

Chamber Performance

Invoke, Beerthoven/Golden Hornet Smackdown IV

Golden Hornet Young Composers Concert, Golden Hornet

i/we, Austin Classical Guitar

It’s About Time: Companions, Texas Early Music Project

The Lavuta Project, Austin Chamber Music Festival

Virgo Veritas, Austin Chamber Music Center

Original Composition/Score

A Study in Release, Catherine Davis

Crone – for Chamber Orchestra, Samuel Lipman

i/we, Joseph V. Williams II

“Songs of Remembrance and Resistance,” Kevin March

Singer

Ryland Angel, Passio/It’s About Time: Companions

Cayla Cardiff, An Early Christmas/It’s About Time: Companions

Liz Cass, La Clemenza di Tito: A Retelling

Marina Costa-Jackson, La Traviata

Carolyn Hoehle, La Clemenza di Tito: A Retelling

Gitanjali Mathur, It’s About Time: Companions

Sandra Piques Eddy, Carmen

Heather Phillips, Carmen

Chad Shelton, Carmen

Jenifer Thyssen, An Early Christmas/It’s About Time: Companions/Complaints Through the Ages

Veronica Williams, “Songs of Remembrance and Resistance”

Ensemble

Aeolus Quartet, Virgo Veritas

Invoke, Beerthoven/Golden Hornet Smackdown IV

Tetractys, Golden Hornet Young Composers Concert

Instrumentalist

Bruce Colson, It’s About Time: Companions

Ian Davidson, Feast of Voices

Artina McCain, Black Composers Concert: The Black Female Composer

Carla McElhaney, Revel Classical Band at Beerthoven

Marcus McGuff, An Early Christmas

Ebonee Thomas, Black Composers Concert: The Black Female Composer

Bruce Williams, Feast of Voices

VISUAL ART

Solo Gallery Exhibition

“Anthony B. Creeden: Cacti and Semaphore,” GrayDuck Gallery

“Bucky Miller: Grackle Actions,” Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum

“Claude van Lingen: Timekeeper,” Co-Lab Projects

“Larry Bamburg: BurlsHoovesandShells on a Pedestal of Conglomerates,” UT Visual Arts Center

“Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons: Notes on Sugar,” Christian-Green Gallery

“Rachel Stuckey: Good Days and Bad Days on the Internet,” Women & Their Work

“Raul Gonzalez: Doing Work,” GrayDuck Gallery

Group Gallery Exhibition

“Collectors Show,” GrayDuck Gallery

“Good Mourning Tis of Thee,” Co-Lab Projects

“In depth: a group show,” Davis Gallery

“Refigured: Radical Realism,” Dougherty Arts Center

“Staycation 2: What in the World?” Mass Gallery

“xoxo,” Museum of Human Achievement

“Yo soy aqui / I am here,” ICOSA

Museum Exhibition

“Rodney McMillian: Against a Civic Death,” The Contemporary Austin

“Line Form Color,” Blanton Museum of Art

“The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip,” Blanton Museum of Art

“Vaudeville,” Ransom Center

“Wangechi Mutu,” The Contemporary Austin

Independent Project

2017 Texas Biennial

Cage Match Project Gallery

The Museum of Pocket Art

Outsider Fest

Gallery, Body of Work

Co-Lab Projects

Dimension Gallery

GrayDuck gallery

Mass Gallery

Museum of Human Achievement

Artist

Jennifer Balkan

Elizabeth Chiles

Michael Anthony Garcia

Revi Meicler

Barry Stone

 

Winning the Austin High School Musical Theatre Awards

Forget the Oscars. Never mind the Tonys. Pay no attention to the Grammys.

Give us the Greater Austin High School Musical Theatre Awards.

Contributed by Cathie Sheridan.

Sure, last night’s ceremony at the Long Center clocked in at just under four hours. Nevertheless, we loved almost every minute of this energetic toast to 38 participating high schools and their remarkable talents.

Some quick observations and then some winners. Playbill’s Tyler Mount was the show’s best emcee yet. Fast, funny and on target with his “paid segues” and promos. Despite the total running time, the show, which highlights dozens of slickly produced musical numbers and video selfies from Broadway pros, felt tighter, more on time this year.

RELATED: Tyler Mount returns to Austin for high school musical theater awards.

Austin City Council Member Jimmy Flannigan just about stole the show and earned the evening’s only unadulterated standing ovation. He showed up to read municipal proclamation — usually a dull task — but donned a little, regal hat and performed a magnificent version to the tune of King George III‘s “You’ll Be Back” from “Hamilton.”

To use a show biz term: He killed! Killed! He should come back every year.

30738502_10155630548619366_1001950745567690752_n
Contributed by Cathie Sheridan.

Enough is enough: Here are the winners.

2018 Greater Austin High School Musical Theatre Awards

Best Production: “The Addams Family,” Dripping Springs High School

Best Actress in a Leading Role: Katie Haberman, “The Addams Family,” Dripping Springs High School

Best Actor in a Leading Role: Stone Mountain, “Catch Me If You Can,” St. Andrew’s Episcopal School

Related: A record 38 schools up for musical awards.

Best Direction: “The Addams Family,” Dripping Springs High School

Best Ensemble: “West Side Story,” McCallum Fine Arts Academy

Best Actress in a Supporting Role: Christine Ashbaugh, “Guys and Dolls,” Marble Falls High School

Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Ryan Mills, “Monty Python’s Spamalot,” Vista Ridge High School

Best Featured Performer: Cassie Martin, “The Addams Family,” Dripping Springs High School

Best Choreography: “Grease,” Cedar Ridge High School

Best Orchestra: “West Side Story,” McCallum Fine Arts Academy

RELATED: All rise for the Austin high school musical.

Best Musical Direction: “Catch Me If You Can,” St. Andrew’s Episcopal School

Best Scenic Design: “Shrek the Musical,” Rouse High School

Student Design Award: Alessandro Hendrix, Crockett High School

Best Costume Design: “Catch Me If You Can,” St. Andrew’s Episcopal School

Best Lighting Design: “Hairspray,” Akins High School

Best Technical Execution: “Chicago,” St. Stephen’s Episcopal School

 

 

Meet the 2018 Austin Arts Hall of Fame inductees

The Austin Critics Table recently announced the latest group to be inducted into the Austin Arts Hall of Fame.

The five honored Austinites have contributed to the city’s cultural scene over the course of many years. They will be inducted 7 p.m. June 4 at Cap City Comedy Club, 8120 Research Blvd. The event is free. Following the inductions, the arts critics will give out awards for the 2017-2018 season. Lots of awards.

RELATED: Giving City toasts Austin Critics Table Awards

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Anuradha Niampally. Contributed by Austin Dance India

The honored are (with the informal journalism group’s identifiers):

Norman Blumensaadt (Different Stages) – company founder, artistic director, director, actor

Kathy Dunn Hamrick (Kathy Dunn Hamrick Dance Company, Cafe Dance) – company founder, artistic director, choreographer, dancer, educator

Michael and Jeanne Klein (Blanton Museum of Art, The Contemporary Austin, Ransom Center, et al.) – patrons, board members, civic leaders, arts advocates

Anuradha Naimpally (Austin Dance India, Cafe Dance) – company founder, artistic director, dancer, choreographer, educator

Elgin’s Margo Sawyer wins Guggenheim Fellowship

Margo Sawyer, the Elgin-based artist whose art intersects sculpture and architecture, has won a coveted Guggenheim Fellowship.

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation recently announced 173 fellowships (including two joint fellowships) in arts and sciences for 2018. This honor comes with up to $45,000 to support one of the winners’ future projects.

“The Guggenheim Fellowship would allow me time and resources to cultivate designs of spaces transcendent,” Sawyer says. “Public places that foster contemplation.”

image1
Artist Margo Sawyer. Contributed

RELATED: Contemporary Austin collection to Blanton Museum.

Sawyer, 59, has been on the University of Texas art faculty for 30 years. For decades, she has transformed old brick structures in Elgin into multi-use arts spaces.

She is the niece of Harlem Renaissance painter Aaron Douglas and her father was one of the first African-Americans to serve in the U.S. diplomatic corps in the 1950s. He met her British mother in Accra, Ghana. Her grandfather founded the NAACP in Topeka, Kan. and helped initiate the legal action that became Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court decision that struck down school segregation.

Sawyer grew up the  U.S., U.K. and Cameroon. In 1973, her mother took her to Egypt during the Yom Kippur War.

“I was about 15 and it was an experience that made me the sculptor I am today,” Sawyer says. “We were the first and only 17 tourists allowed in the country. I spent 30 minutes alone in Tutankhamun’s tomb — an obsession as with many people ever since. The experience at Abu Simbel, where the monuments are carved into the living rock, a union of sculpture, architecture and painting united, has been my modus operandi all my life.”

Margo floor up
From Margo Sawyer’s recent solo show, ‘Reflect: Reflector,’ at the San Antonio Play House.

She is currently working on a glass colored spiral immersive sculpture for the U.S. Embassy in Kosovo.

“The viewer will be enveloped in a pool of color,” Sawyer says. “I just completed windows for a private chapel and also I’m working on a commission for the University of Houston all with hand-painted glass being made with Franz Mayer of Munich, who did the exquisite windows for Ellsworth Kelly‘s ‘Austin.”’

RELATED: Ellsworth Kelly’s ‘Austin’ worships light.

Sawyer realizes this is a big turning point during a long career of many achievements, including many works placed in private homes, museum collections and public spaces, along with wide recognition in the Austin arts community, including the Austin Critics Table designation as 2015 Artist of the Year.

“This is an amazing moment for me,” she says. “I have been making sculpture since I was 14 years old, and am honored that I have been a sculptor throughout my life. This year feels transformative and the recognition is monumental, a testament to the personal commitment and belief in the vision I have created.”

 

Your input needed for Texas Medal of Arts Awards

Since 2001, the Texas Cultural Trust, an advocacy group, has been honoring our state’s luminaries through the Texas Medal of Arts. The laurels are bestowed every other year at one of the most glamorous galas in Texas. The most recent one in 2017 at Bass Concert Hall was a blow-out.

John Paul and Eloise DeJoria win a 2017 Texas Medal of Arts Award for their corporate philanthropy with Patron and Paul Mitchell. Contributed.

RELATED: What the arts mean to great Texas artists and patrons.

Now the Trust wants your input.

Send your nominations in by April 5, 2018 for the February 2019 edition of the honors. Categories include architecture, arts education, arts patron (corporate, foundation or individual), dance, design, film, lifetime achievement, literary arts, media/multimedia, music, television, theater and visual arts.

RELATED: Soaking up the glamour of Texas Medal of Arts.

For a complete list of past honorees, go here. The 2017 winners included Eloise and John Paul DeJoria with Paul Mitchell/Patron, Kris Kristofferson, Lynn Wyatt, Lauren Anderson, Yolanda Adams, Renee Elise Goldsberry, Tobin Endowmen, Dallas Black Dance Theatre, Leo Villareal, Frank Welch, John Phillip Santos, Scott Pelley and Kenny Rogers.

Heidi Marquez Smith is new exec at Texas Cultural Trust

The former head of the Texas Book Festival will now lead the Texas Cultural Trust.

Heidi Marquez Smith takes over as executive director at the statewide arts advocacy group after the departure of Jennifer Ransom Rice. 

Heidi Marquez Smith is the new boss at Texas Cultural Trust. Contributed

“As a long-time, passionate advocate for literacy and the arts, I am thrilled to be part of an organization that promotes the vital role of the arts in education and actively supports our state’s many talented artists and educators,” Marquez Smith says. “I look forward to advancing the work of the Trust to build awareness of the quantifiable impact of art in the classroom and the Texas economy, and the important role of the arts in building a competitive workforce for the future of our state.”

Most recently a consultant with her own firm, Marquez Smith is actively involved in the leadership of the Texas Lyceum, St. David’s FoundationDell Children’s Trust and Texas Book Festival. She also volunteers at Eanes Elementary School, Hill Country Middle School, Eanes Education FoundationPop-Up Birthday, LBJ Presidential Library and the city of Rollingwood.

Perhaps most impressively, she served as Special Assistant to the President for Cabinet Liaison under President George W. Bush.

It takes quite a diplomat to run the Trust, which hands out the Texas Medal of Arts in a grand biennial ceremony; directly promotes arts education; and meanwhile attempts to convince Texas legislators to support dollars for the arts. Recently, that august body reduced funding by 28 percent, which means that soon only $6 million will be spent by the state each year on the arts. By way of contrast, the city of Austin alone spends $12 million.

IN-DEPTH: Legislature cuts Texas arts funding 28 percent.