Step inside the enchanted stick village at Pease Park

Kids rush into the doors and hang out the windows. Adults step gingerly over the mulch floors and step back to view the five, tall, curved, leaning structures that look like something from “Where the Wild Things Are” or “The Hobbit.”

“We let the kids in early,” says StickWork artist Patrick Dougherty. “They weren’t sure they were allowed to come in the gate.”

Sam Dougherty works on a stick work sculpture with his artist father Patrick Dougherty, from Chapel Hill, N.C.  RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

The fences come down today. The public unveiling is 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Feb. 10, courtesy of the Pease Park Conservancy.

“We wanted to make a cathedral,” Dougherty says. “We got five corners instead.”

The $106,000 project made from 10 tons of locally harvested then bent, woven and fastened Texas ash, elm, ligustrum and depression willow were built in three weeks by Dougherty and his son, Sam, along with volunteers and staff from Houston’s Weingarten Art Group. The site off Parkway not far from Windsor Road was picked because of accessibility and parking, but it’s also a little sheltered and not clearly visible from North Lamar Boulevard.

Volunteer Carol Burton helps to intertwine tree saplings into an inner wall of a the sculpture is made entirely out of tree saplings and is made possible by the Pease Park Conservancy which is committed to enhancing the cultural environment of the park. RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Dougherty, who has built 288 of these StickWork projects around the world after working on a family cabin, had always wanted to work in Austin. He says the still-unnamed group of five structures should last two years before they begin to deteriorate seriously.

The Conservancy will maintain the art, then, with the help mulch the remains to spread around the park.

READ EXPANDED STORY ON OUR PREMIUM PAGE.

Update: An earlier version of this post said the project cost more.

See how artists will light up Waller Creek this year

The Waller Creek Conservancy has announced its 2017 line-up for the light-based  “Creek Show.” Now in its fourth year, the jam of artworks employs the spacey spaces of the creek bed and banks to illuminate its potential as a destination park. The family-friendly sequence will run Nov. 10-18.

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The six planned light shows for 2017. Contributed by Waller Creek Conservancy

Here go the artists and their planned art:

“No Lifeguard on Duty” by Asakura Robinson

“Fotan Fable” by HA Architecture

“Night Garden” by dwg

“Ephemeral Suspension” by Pathos + TouchTo

“Blind Spot” by Two+ Collaborative

“Submerge” by Davey McEarthron Architecture + Studio Lumina + Drophouse

RELATED: Creek Show preview 2016.

Austin public art that pleases the public

There’s no telling which art will be readily embraced by the public.

But one can guess by the number of images that pop up online quickly.

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‘atx’ has attracted a lot of snaps in the western sector of downtown. Contributed.
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This tree-like sculpture floats like a cloud over Rock Rose in Domain Northside. Folks love it. Contributed by Community Impact.
'Spiral of the Galaxy' was an instant hit, especially with kids, in the plaza of the Dell Medical School. Contributed by CultureMap Austin.
‘Spiral of the Galaxy’ was an instant hit, especially with kids, in the plaza of the Dell Medical School. Contributed by CultureMap Austin.

2Dance2Dream brings dance to all kids

The dancers at 2Dance2Dream stand in a circle in a Balance Dance Studios classroom. The music is thumping.

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Pilar Rivera, 15, takes her turn dancing across the room. “I like McKenna teaching me,” she says. “I love the dance moves we’re doing.” Kelly West/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

One by one they take turns entering the circle and showing off their dance moves, but then there’s a pause.

A dancer hesitates. Another dancer takes her hand and they move into the circle to dance together.

This is the vision of 2Dance2Dream: that all kids can dance; that all kids will want to dance, given the encouragement, the patience and maybe some assistance.

The organization is the brainchild of Austinite Julie Lyles Carr, 49, and her daughter McKenna Carr, 22. Since 2011, local dance studios have opened up their classrooms for 2Dance2Dream to bring dance instruction to kids with special needs including Down syndrome, autism, cerebral palsy, chromosomal anomalies and undiagnosed differences.

“It has its own magic,” says Julie Lyles Carr, who serves in the women’s ministry at LifeAustin church and has written a parenting advice book, “Raising An Original.” “There’s nothing like seeing someone exceed what people think.

We’re bringing the Austin Arts blog up to date by teasing to recent and still relevant arts stories on other American-Statesman and Austin360 pages.

This was a snippet of Nicole Villalpando’s piece for dance for all.