Austin Opera leader turns to Big Data

 

This past fall, Austin Opera flew in Annie Burridge, a candidate for general director, to watch its staging of “The Manchurian Candidate.”

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Austin Opera general director Annie Burridge is a coloratura soprano but was more drawn to the business end of the art. Contributed by Paul Sirochman

“I sat down in the hall,” says the former managing director of Opera Philadelphia. “The second the performance started, I bolted forward in my seat. I couldn’t believe the caliber of the musicianship.”

At that night’s dinner, Burridge was seated next to the show’s composer, Kevin Puts, who had won a Pulitzer Prize for his first opera, “Silent Night.”

“Kevin was nearly in tears at how happy he was with the performance,” she says of the piece adapted from a famous film and first staged by Minnesota Opera. “(Artistic director) Richard Buckley had worked with him on editing it. That’s so important for new works. You know, there’s usually not a lot of rewards for opera companies doing subsequent performances. Everyone wants to give the premiere. Austin gave Kevin and his opera a key second hearing.”

Quietly keen with short hair and acute eyes, Burridge is a coloratura soprano with a special zeal not just for the art form but also for big data and the ways that sophisticated marketing research can tune opera to serve diverse audiences.  …

We’re bringing the Austin Arts blog up to date by teasing to recent and still relevant arts stories on other American-Statesman and Austin360 pages.

This is a key piece on Austin Opera’s new general manager:

Austin Opera unrolls next season

First out of the performing arts gate for the 2017-2018 season is Austin Opera.

While its current show, “Daughter of the Regiment,” gears up for a second weekend, we can look forward to three treats next go round.

RELATED: Austin Opera’s general director turns to Big Data to engage audiences.

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We’re not promising that Austin Opera’s “Carmen” will look anything like this Australian outing. Contributed.

Next in January and February is a much rarer gem, Richard Strauss’ “Ariadne auf Naxos,” appearing for the first time in Austin as far as I can determine.

Finally, Austin Opera returns to the best-loved list with Giuseppe Verdi’s “La Traviata,” in fact, the most popular  opera, accredited in Operabase from the same reporting period (2009-2015).